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I have been interested in the health effects of arsenic for 30 years. One of my most memorable and impactful experiences was my service in 1996 as a Temporary Advisor to the World Health Organization to assist the government of India in its response to mass arsenic poisoning in the Ganges delta. In West Bengal, and in neighboring Bangladesh, millions of people have been overexposed to arsenic naturally present in groundwater. In this photo, I am shown examining a young child who was affected by arsenic contamination in her village well.

Clean Air Ambassador | Denver, Colorado

Michael Kosnett

I am a physician specializing in occupational and environmental medicine and medical toxicology. I am an Associate Clinical Professor in the Division of Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Colorado School of Public Health. I have had a long term clinical interest in the toxicology of heavy metals, particularly arsenic and lead.

The adverse health effects of arsenic have emerged as a key issue of concern regarding the disposal of coal combustion wastes. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has identified the potential for arsenic leaching from coal ash in landfills or surface impoundments to contaminate groundwater used as a drinking water source. Of all the carcinogens in drinking water regulated by EPA, the evidence establishing the cancer risk from arsenic is the strongest and most compelling.

The public health significance of the health risk posed by arsenic and its presence in coal ash merits its close regulation on the federal level by EPA.

The public health significance of the health risk posed by arsenic and its presence in coal ash merits its close regulation on the federal level by EPA.

50 States United For Healthy Air

Clean air should be a fundamental right. Air pollution causes asthma attacks, lung disease, and even death. But our bodies don't have to be the dumping ground for dirty industries.

The technology to dramatically reduce harmful air pollution is available today, and major polluters should be required to use it.

Clean Air Ambassadors from every state are sending a powerful message: Everyone has a right to breathe clean, healthy air.

It’s time Congress and the EPA used their ears to help our lungs.