2013 Clean Air Ambassador: Peggy Ann Berry

Ohio
Clean Air Ambassador | Dayton, oh
Peggy Ann Berry, PhD(c), MSN, RN
Affiliation:
American Nurses Association
  • The Story
    Behind This Photo

    TO ME, THIS PHOTO MEANS:

    This is my mother at age 55. There was a metal-painting factory located just one block away from where she lived, and the fumes from that place deeply affected her. At times, the smell was bad enough to make my mother and sister nauseous. My mother ultimately developed asthma.

Ohio:
Ambassador  Susan Tullai-McGuinness Ph.D., RN.
Ambassador  Julie Weatherington-Rice Ph.D..
Ambassador  Tyiesha Radford .
z:
Ambassador Jeffrey   Louden.
Ambassador Patricia   Schuba.
Ambassador Andre   Gibson.
Ambassador Denise   Abdul-Rahman.

In the First Person:

Clean air is necessary for life and good health. That’s why I’m kicking my concerns upstairs to national leaders and I will NOT be quiet when I see a safety and health concern

Since I was a child, I have been painfully aware that the quality of our lives, the lives of our children and grandchildren depend on the quality of clean air we breathe. I grew up near a factory that manufactured and painted metal. Everyday, my mother struggled to breath and sometimes would become physically ill because of the fumes. I don’t want my 12 year old grandson to have that same struggle; I want the environment to be good for him as he grows up.

I am an occupational and environmental nurse, and environmental issues still continue to concern me. We are at a point in time with the economy that businesses are pushing to eliminate the environmental protections currently in place through the EPA. Our many different voices need to stand with a united voice to promote industry’s accountability to communities and their employees to sustain clean air. Clean air is necessary for life and good health. That’s why I’m kicking my concerns upstairs to national leaders and I will NOT be quiet when I see a safety and health concern.

If I had to say one thing to our President and Congress it would be: Don't let business dilute the impact of the EPA.

The Clean Air Act has not only saved lives but the cost of implementation is far less than the cost savings. By 2020, the Clean Air Act will prevent 230,000 early deaths by 2020 by reducing the particulate emissions for tall smokestacks and tailpipes. This is why I’d also ask the United States to work with the World Health Organization and fund development of new technology that further eliminates particulate emissions for a safer environment. And when I do, I expect that my voice matters to my senator.

Messages of Support:

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