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Abigail Dillen's blog

Lake Michigan dunes with power plant in background

President Trump has made promises to clean up our nation’s drinking water, but those are promises his administration has no intention of keeping. As President Trump’s EPA Chief, Scott Pruitt, made perfectly clear yesterday, the right to clean water is nowhere on the agenda. Pruitt spent the day flacking his "back-to-basics" plan to scrap the health and environmental protections we all rely on—protections only the government can provide.

Photo courtesy of Abigal Dillen

Being a mother makes the future present. What day is there when you don’t have a glimpse of your child as a grown-up? I am not a planner when it comes to my own life. I am bad at saving money—that is, I generally don’t. But I can see the smart, funny, capable 18-year-old my son Sher will be, and so, I am evolving a new skill of saving so I can pay for college fifteen years from now.

NASA/NOAA via NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

The stroke of a pen has been known to shape the course of history. On Earth Day, more than 170 countries signed the global climate deal reached in Paris last December. Do their signatures herald a turning point? Will our children’s children learn to revere the Paris Agreement as the global charter that secured their future? It depends on what we do—or fail to do—in the next two years to implement and strengthen the agreement.

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court temporarily stayed the Clean Power Plan, but business leaders are already working on the transition to clean energy sources and have no plans to stop.

America’s contribution to global climate action is unfolding against the backdrop of a courtroom drama that threatens to obscure what should be center stage—the accelerating shift away from coal and toward clean energy that is already happening across the country. 

Notre Dame Cathedral

Something profound happened in Paris last week and we have to celebrate it. One hundred and ninety-five nations came together and made a pact to act against climate change. They agreed to hold global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius, with a target of no more than 1.5 degrees. They agreed to revisit this year's commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions in 2020, when it will be even cheaper and easier to get off of fossil fuels. The countries that got rich burning fossil fuels agreed to help fund climate solutions for countries that didn't.

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