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Adrian Martinez's blog

Container ship docked at the Port of Oakland

Ten years ago, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach adopted their first version of the Clean Air Action Plan. This plan marked the first time in history that large port authorities put forward a comprehensive plan to address the toxic diesel emissions that spew into fenceline neighborhoods. The plan was especially notable because these ports are big players in our nation’s freight system and can set major trends.

Severe weather striking Southern California highlights the need to reform our energy grid.

Southern California can’t catch a break this year. Hit by a series of devastating wildfires along with extreme heat waves and drought, it’s beginning to feel like parched conditions and scorched earth are the state’s new normal. Climate change is worsening droughts in California, turning forests into tinderboxes and exacerbating wildfires.

On Thursday, the California Air Resources Board—the state agency charged with bringing clean air to Californians—heard a proposed plan from its staff on how to tackle the pernicious problem of freight pollution in California. The ships, trucks, trains and aircraft that move freight throughout California and into the rest of the country undoubtedly provide economic benefits to Californians.

The recent wave of disgusting air days in the Los Angeles region solidified the area’s necessity for both clean energy and clean ports to help us reclaim our air.

The estimated 18 million people living in the Los Angeles region deserve the reprieve that these two things can bring, and it starts with the twin ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

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