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Andrea Treece's blog

Dusky shark

A toothy top predator roves across a wide plain hunting for prey. The beast is magnificently adapted to her surroundings—her sleek, grey shape nearly fades into the distant blue despite her impressive size. She will travel hundreds of miles this season following food and favorable temperatures, eventually finding a mate in the vast range of her travels. Many months later, she will deliver pups and, with them, a bit more hope for her species.

The humpback whale is one species that migrates along the California coast.

Just a couple of miles offshore in Monterey Bay on a grey November day, the ocean surface behind our whale watching boat started to boil with anchovies. As we watched, astonished, a cloud of them shimmered out of the water, followed by the lunging head of a humpback whale. Its enormous throat billowed as it swallowed the unsuccessfully fleeing anchovies. Even our guide exclaimed at the sight. But that exclamation was followed by a note of worry: “You see those buoys right near the whales—those are for crab gear.

I’ve always been a biology geek.

As a kid, the ocean gave me a sense of awe and belonging.  I loved the other-worldly creatures of the sea and all the unexpected ways they interact with one another. I still love to be outside, in the water, exploring and observing the natural world.  So why, in the name of all that is good and sensible, did I become a lawyer? 

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