Skip to main content

Jessica Knoblauch's blog

Robert Marschelewski/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 / https://flic.kr/p/arJkYQ

While 90 percent of Americans support mandatory labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods, certain members of Congress want to hide this information from consumers. This past week, the House of Representatives passed a weak GE labeling bill that will nullify stronger state labeling laws—including a GE labeling law passed in Vermont.

fields in Hawaii

Last week, Hawai‛i counties were back in court to defend their right to protect themselves from genetically engineered (GE) crops and the harmful pesticides that they’re modified to withstand. At stake is whether communities have a say over what goes on in their own backyards. But the Big Ag industry would have you believe these cases are about protecting upstanding companies from hostile anti-GE activists and their senseless acts of vandalism.

Grizzly 399 and three of her cubs walk down Pilgrim Creek Road in Grand Teton National Park.

This spring, as wildflowers bloom and snowy mountain peaks thaw, a 400-pound matriarch of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is expected to emerge from her den. With any luck, a fresh batch of cubs will accompany her, marking another successful year in one of the greatest conservation success stories ever told.

Grand Canyon

When the U.S. Forest Service last week rejected an Italian investment group’s plan for a sprawling development near the south rim of the Grand Canyon, it was a rare victory for the natural world over the relentless onslaught of tract houses, beauty spas, parking lots and shopping malls. Here are six reasons to celebrate Earthjustice’s victory for Grand Canyon National Park and the delicate landscapes that surround it:

Wolverine Nazzu/Shutterstock

Once decimated by traps and poison, only a few hundred wolverines remained at the turn of this century when Tim Preso, the managing attorney of Earthjustice's Northern Rockies office, took up their cause against unsympathetic state governments and the George W. Bush administration. After many years and court battles, in February 2013 the federal government proposed to protect the wolverine as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

Buck Parker at Crater Lake in southern Oregon.

Vawter “Buck” Parker describes himself as “the kid in the back of the car daydreaming and looking at the passing landscape” as his family took long rides through Oregon, where he grew up. Those years set him on course for a lifetime of protecting the wild, first as a private lawyer, then for 35 years with Earthjustice, which he led for more than a decade. As he retires to his home in Hood River, Buck reflects on how he got involved with Earthjustice and how he helped shape its direction during a time when conservation efforts evolved into the powerful environmental movement.

Pages

About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.