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Keith Rushing's blog

Fiona helps prepare a sign that reads "I am 3 years old and I have asthma. Protect my lungs."

Three years ago, Gretchen Dahlkemper had to rush to the emergency room with her 11-month-old daughter, Fiona, who was struggling to breathe. “Her lips turned blue and she was making a funny noise—at first I thought it was a child’s toy I was hearing.”

It turns out asthma was the cause of Fiona’s breathing problems.

“You can’t imagine the terror you feel when you have a tiny baby who can’t catch her breath,” Dahlkemper said, adding, “You rush to the hospital and hope you can get there in time.”

This mural in Brooklyn, NY raises asthma awareness.

A couple of weeks ago President Obama connected climate change and the pollution that causes it to the asthma that his daughter, Malia, suffered from as a young child.

“What I can relate to is the fear a parent has, when your 4-year-old daughter comes up to you and says, ‘Daddy, I’m having trouble breathing,’ Obama said in an interview broadcast on ABC. “The fright you feel is terrible.”

Kids walking in a park

Black Lives Matter leaders brilliantly reframed Black History Month, Black Future Month, to focus on a separate cultural or political issue facing African Americans every day in February.

It was so appropriate, so smart, to set aside time to not only grapple with a large set of issues—indelibly linked to the structural, institutional and individual racism our communities face—but to give time to envisioning ourselves and our communities as we want them to be.

Dr. Bullard SXSW

Earthjustice—in recognition of Black History Month—is sharing articles and videos about African Americans who have made contributions to the environmental movement. In addition to recognizing the courageous work of others, Earthjustice’s own African-American staff will also share personal stories about how they became involved in the environmental movement.

Think of food politics as an increasingly complex, layered and controversial arena where people make decisions about food or food production based not just on the food itself but its impact on the environment, health, the treatment of animals, working conditions and pay, just to name a few factors.

Celebrity chefs, food writers and even Hollywood actors are taking sides and sometime calling names.

Deborah Cipolla-Dennis, of Dryden, NY.

This guest blog post was written by Deborah Cipolla-Dennis, a resident of Dryden, NY, and member of the Dryden Resources Awareness Coalition.

Along with her neighbors, she helped pass one of the first local fracking bans in New York State.

What does my 14,000-person rural town in upstate New York have in common with Los Angeles, one of the country’s largest metropolitan areas?

About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.