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Maggie Caldwell's blog

The rare supermoon lunar eclipse incited wolf howls from a crowd of San Francisco sky-gazers on Sunday night.

The other night I stood with a few friends and about 100 other people at an overlook in San Francisco’s Presidio to watch the rare blood moon eclipse. Right as the orange moon emerged above the cloud line over the Bay, some people across the way raised their heads and let out a howl. Soon the whole mass of strangers, toddler-age to seniors, joined together in a chorus of wolf cries as the moon passed through the Earth’s shadow.

Wolf party attendees howl for the camera as they prepare their #JoinThePack video to honor wolves.

It began with a howl. Actually, to be more accurate, it began with a brainstorming session about how we wanted to spread the message about threats to wolves in a non-traditional fashion. And then the meeting ended with everyone in the room spontaneously howling. It wasn’t on the agenda, but it felt so good!

"Happily Ever After" is one of the illustrations born out of Earthjustice's collaboration with Creative Action Network in this campaign.

For over a decade now, many American films and prestige television dramas have been dedicated to exploring the lives of society’s bad guys. From mobsters to meth cooks, these shows and films examine the lives of the traditional villains, revealing complex motivations and moments of empathy that destroy archetypes and show these characters to be flawed, yes, but much more human than we’d ever imagined.

Tom Murphy

Tom Murphy grew up on a cattle ranch east of the Black Hills of South Dakota, seemingly destined to be a cowboy. But the truth is he detests cows. He’s not fond of horses either. They both mean work to him. Instead he left home to study chemistry, but abandoned that pursuit to bum around the country for five years before landing in Livingston, Montana near the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park. A self-taught photographer, he has spent more than 3,000 days hiking, skiing and rafting through the park taking pictures of the grizzlies, wolves and bison that cross his path.

Meredith Taylor talks about her experience seeing wolves return to Yellowstone.

Meredith Taylor was growing weary of forcing mice to smoke. The biologist’s pulmonary research was important—it would eventually help lead to the surgeon general issuing health warnings on cigarette packs—but she felt the experimentation on little rodents was messing with her karma. Like her subjects, she was feeling caged in, working long days in the Boston laboratory. So, one day she left, to embark on a solo jaunt along the Pacific Crest Trail. She never looked back.

Gray wolf howling in the Grand Tetons in Wyoming.

Conservationist Bob Ferris once remarked, “Wolves are very resourceful. All they need to survive is for people not to shoot them.” If I were to amend that statement at all, it would be to add that wolves also need for politicians not to meddle with the law that protects them from being shot at in the first place. 


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unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.