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Phillip Ellis's blog

A foggy morning in Baltimore

Imagine for a moment you are forced to breathe through a straw, only from one nostril. Now, imagine that straw shrinks to the size of a coffee stirrer, making it even more difficult—nearly impossible—to inhale enough oxygen. This is what asthma feels like for Doris Toles, a Baltimore resident who had her first asthma attack when she was just two years old.

Ana E. Nobis is an occupational and environmental medicine physician and discusses how the EPA’s plan to cut carbon pollution from power plants is essential to avert the devastating consequences of global warming for our children.

This is a guest blog by Ana E. Nobis, M.D., MPH, a recent graduate from the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Occupational and Environmental Medicine residency program. Dr. Nobis is also a graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, where she was an Annika Rodriguez Scholar.

A coastal church in Iceland

This is a guest blog by Rev. Dr. Terry Gallagher. He is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. Educated originally as an engineer, Terry, following a 30 year career as an industrial manufacturing executive, answered the call to ministry. He attained a Master of Divinity degree from the Ecumenical Theological Seminary in Detroit and a Doctor of Ministry degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary. He served as a local church pastor in Michigan for seven years.

The Clean Power Plan—a component of the latest update to the Clean Air Act, which began in the 1950s—requires states to reduce their coal power plants’ emissions by 30 percent of 2005 levels, over the next five years.

This is a guest blog by Jazelle Hunt, NNPA Columnist.

When Cheeraz Gormon received an invitation to lobby in Washington on behalf of President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan with environmental legal advocacy nonprofit, Earthjustice, she was bewildered.

"We are confronted on a daily basis with a Fast and Furious gang tasked with thwarting any practical and bi-partisan effort to solve, or even acknowledge, climate change."

For me, spring brings an overwhelming desire to wear flip-flops and a deepening resentment of weather that just won't warm fast enough. If my office is any indicator, spring also brings relatives, lots of them, to gawk at cherry blossoms and clog our streets and sidewalks.

Recently, my parents visited the area. Of course, I took them to see the normal DC sites, but what my dad really wanted to see was the IMAX/3-D theater that I had been bragging about for months. As luck would have it, one of his favorite movie franchises -- Fast and Furious -- was playing.

The University of Michigan Law School

This is a guest post by Lori Atherton. It was published on April 24, 2015 by Michigan Law, University of Michigan. 

Emma Cheuse, '06, came to Michigan Law because of its strong reputation for public service. Her advice to students and graduates who have yet to discover the right career path within the public service realm? Explore different public service paths until you find the right fit.

Kayford Mountain in West Virginia has been devastated by mountaintop removal mining.

(First published in the Huffington Post.)

If you listened only to President Obama's critics in the coal industry and public officials from coal states, you'd probably think that environmentalists and others concerned by the many harmful impacts of coal and other carbon fuels would be well pleased with the administration.

The E.W. Brown Generating Station in 2011.

[Updated on 12.22.14] Late Friday afternoon, the Kentucky Public Service Commission approved the solar project. Expected to go online in 2016, the project becomes the Commonwealth’s largest solar facility and appears to be the first utility-scale renewable energy project in the state.

An industrial incinerator frames a church playground in Midlothian, Texas.

(First published in the Huffington Post.)

Joe Poole Lake is a popular destination for Dallas and Fort Worth residents looking for a weekend escape to the great outdoors. Lined with barbecue grills, hiking trails and sandy beaches, the 7,400-acre lake and its wooden welcome sign invite endless opportunities to relax and unwind.

A sign warning of the presence of asbestos.

Every day, just in the course of normal activities, we are exposed to an unbelievable range of toxic chemicals that we may not know about. Of the 80,000 plus chemicals that have been approved to be on the market in the United States, approximately 24,000 are “secret”. Literally, we don’t know what they are.

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About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.