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Rebecca Bowe's blog

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Editor's note: The Obama  administration’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management announced today that it will deny six pending permit applications to conduct airgun seismic surveys in the Atlantic Ocean. Earthjustice has worked for years to oppose harmful seismic blasting, which is used to search for oil and gas deposits under the seafloor. For whales and other marine mammals that rely on sound for survival, this extreme noise pollution can have deadly consequences.

View of Mineral Mountain at the entrance to the historic community of Old Chico, a popular tourist destination for those looking for peace and quiet. This will be the access road for Lucky Minerals drilling rigs and heavy equipment.
Editor's note: U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell recently responded to calls from local community leaders, joined by environmental groups including Earthjustice, to protect more than 30,000 acres of public land near Yellowstone National Park from two gold mine proposals. The lands serve as some of the last refuges for our nation’s most iconic symbols of wildness—grizzly bears, lynx and wolverines. The new protections are the result of a mineral withdrawal proposal, which triggers a two-year moratorium on mining activity.
With more Washington farmers moving from barges to rail to ship crops, the call grows to remove dams on the Snake River and restore the dwindling salmon population.

It’s harvest time, and Bryan Jones’ farmhouse is filled with guests who have traveled to eastern Washington to lend a helping hand.

“We’re harvesting winter wheat,” he says.

It’s a hot, dry mid-July day. Thanks to extra sets of hands from family members, Jones guesses the wheat will be harvested in just a couple days. Soon after, they’ll start collecting the mustard crop.

John Crux/Shutterstock

It wasn’t especially charismatic, just a small rodent, scurrying around on an extremely limited patch of habitat on a low-lying island on the surface of the Great Barrier Reef. Yet the disappearance of the Australian Bramble Cay melomys made headlines this summer—because scientists deemed the critter, also known as the mosaic-tailed rat, to be the first mammal to go extinct as a result of manmade climate change.

offshore oil field

Time is running out for the public to tell the Obama administration to protect our oceans from future offshore drilling. People celebrated World Oceans Day with film screenings, beach cleanups, festivals and special events at aquariums. This global celebration of the briny deep also happens to arrive just as Earthjustice and our partner organizations are entering the final push against federal plans for new offshore oil and gas leasing.

Glenn Nagel/iStock

Scientists believe it takes around two million years for a new species to come into existence. Species extinction, on the other hand, can occur in the comparative blink of an eye. Unfortunately, North America’s imperiled flora and fauna aren’t getting the help they need from congressional leaders in Washington, D.C., putting more and more species under threat.

TheGreenMan/Shutterstock

Early in the morning on Thanksgiving Day in 2012, a father and two sons ventured out for an elk hunt in Grand Teton National Park. Trekking softly through the woods around 7:25 a.m., the trio encountered a 534-pound grizzly bear, which may have been feeding on a nearby elk carcass. During the ensuing confrontation, the hunters raised their rifles and fired at the grizzly, killing it.

About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.