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Thomas Cmar's blog

Power plants are the largest source of toxic water pollution in the U.S., but the EPA has issued new regulations that will require power plants to use affordable, state-of-the-art technologies to reduce their pollution.

We don’t use phones, drive cars or fly airplanes that were built based on 1982 safety standards, so why should we allow power plants to dump poisons into our waters under such outdated standards?

Today, the EPA took an important step toward updating these standards by issuing requirements that power plants use affordable, state-of-the-art technologies to reduce their pollution—or eliminate the pollution altogether where feasible. 

Power plant next to a stream

People who don’t follow environmental issues closely may not realize that where we get our electricity is the most consequential decision we make in terms of whether we have clean air and safe drinking water or not.  Power plants, especially coal-burning power plants, are the largest polluters of our waterways by far—more than the next nine largest industries combined

A mother and child near an industrial plant.

Last week, the independent investigative news site ProPublica released a major new investigative report on the most powerful government office you’ve probably never heard of: the White House Office of Management and Budget’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, known as “OIRA” for short.

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