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Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

The Latest On: Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

February 5, 2013 | In the News: The Telegraph

Coal ash findings could have big impact on power companies

Lawsuits filed last week against Plant Scherer in Georgia’s DeKalb County have the potential to set a strong precedent for regulations on coal ash waste that would hold the utility industry accountable and protect public health. The lawsuits accuse both plant owners and Georgia Power of negligence in environmental reports and fraud in assuring the public of coal ash waste’s environmental safety.

January 22, 2013 | Blog Post

Tr-Ash Talk: Bullying the Messenger, Burying the Truth

The Congressional Research Service, the non-partisan research arm of the Library of Congress, drew anger from two legislators after it issued an unfavorable report on their coal ash bills (S. 3512 and H.R. 2273). Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) and Rep. David McKinley (R-WV) have aggressively pursued the CRS since early December, after it gave both bills a failing grade, finding their weaknesses “unprecedented” in environmental law.

January 15, 2013 | Blog Post

Tr-Ash Talk: Is There Something In Missouri's Water?

In Missouri, rape apparently does not cause pregnancy, and it’s OK for children to eat coal ash.

When Missouri Republican Todd Akin said last August that “legitimate rape” rarely results in conception, the congressman caused quite a stir—and this offensive nonsense, broadcast coast to coast, likely cost him a Senate seat.

December 13, 2012 | Blog Post

Tr-Ash Talk: From Dirty Past To Sunny Future

In his address at the Tribal Nations Conference, President Obama spoke with his usual eloquence about invigorating growth on tribal lands, and the perfect example of this new growth is the Moapa solar project on the Moapa River Indian Reservation. Situated just 30 miles north of Las Vegas, the site will generate up to 350 megawatts of clean, renewable energy. It highlights in many ways the future of the nation’s energy supply, and unfortunately the Paiute Indians themselves know the industry’s cloudy past.

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