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Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

The Latest On: Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

July 22, 2014 | Feature

Planeta Saludable

Earthjustice se compromete a luchar por el derecho a un medio ambiente saludable para todos. También estamos comprometidos a contar las historias de la gente, las comunidades, la vida silvestre y los lugares naturales que juegan un papel fundamental en esta lucha.

July 8, 2014 | Blog Post

Coal Ash Stories Come to Washington

Federal coal ash protections are due in December, provided Congress doesn't get in the way. Citizens arrived in Washington to tell their coal ash stories.

June 5, 2014 | Case

Ending Dangerous Coal Ash Pollution into Florida's Apalachicola River

On behalf of three conservation groups, Earthjustice has filed a federal lawsuit to stop toxic water pollution that is leaking into the Apalachicola River from an aging 40-acre coal ash dump at Gulf Power Company’s Scholz Generating Plant near Sneads, Florida. The groups say Gulf Power is illegally discharging dangerous pollutants—including arsenic and lead—into the river, threatening people and the environment in the most ecologically-diverse area of the southern United States.

May 14, 2014 | Case

Ending Dangerous Coal Ash Pollution into the Ohio River

Time-lapse photography from a camera strapped to a tree captured a year’s worth of images proving that dangerous coal ash wastewater from a plant owned by the utility company Louisville Gas & Electric is pouring unabated into the Ohio River.

May 14, 2014 | Case

Cleaning Up Power Plant Water Pollution

Power plant water discharges are filled with toxic pollution such as mercury, arsenic, lead, and selenium—heavy metals that can cause neurological and developmental damage, cause harm in utero, damage internal organs and cause cancer. Power plants are the biggest sources of water pollution in the country, yet the EPA has not reviewed regulations for this industry in more than 30 years.

April 11, 2014 | Feature

The Coal Ash Problem

Coal ash is filled with toxic levels of multiple pollutants—which can poison drinking water sources. No federal regulations for this waste currently exist. See the infographic, and learn how you can help to solve the coal ash problem.

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