Skip to main content

Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

The Latest On: Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

May 14, 2014 | Case

Ending Dangerous Coal Ash Pollution into the Ohio River

Time-lapse photography from a camera strapped to a tree captured a year’s worth of images proving that dangerous coal ash wastewater from a plant owned by the utility company Louisville Gas & Electric is pouring unabated into the Ohio River.

May 14, 2014 | Case

Cleaning Up Power Plant Water Pollution

Toxic water pollution sickens people, and power plants are by far its largest source. Arsenic, mercury, cadmium, lead and other pollutants are being discharged into public waters from power plants without any specific limits.

April 28, 2014 | In the News: Marketplace

Coal Ash = Environmental Win (When You Recycle It)

The Environmental Protection Agency endorsed mixing coal ash into cement as an alternative to storing it in ponds, claiming it makes cement stronger and emits less emissions than other cement refining techniques. Mixing coal ash into cement could also prevent toxins such as arsenic, lead and mercury from contaminating groundwater. “I think characterizing it as a ‘win’ would be accurate. If you’re going to make coal ash in the first place, locking it up in concrete is preferable to a lot of the other ways we use or dispose of coal ash,” said Earthjustice attorney Lisa Evans.

April 11, 2014 | Feature

The Coal Ash Problem

Coal ash is filled with toxic levels of multiple pollutants—which can poison drinking water sources. See the infographic, and learn how you can help to solve the coal ash problem.

March 10, 2014 | Case

Defending Uniontown, AL from Toxic Coal Ash

Earthjustice is representing six Alabama residents in a civil rights complaint under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits recipients of federal funds, including state agencies, from taking actions or implementing policies that have unjustified disproportionate adverse effect on the basis of race.

March 6, 2014 | Feature

A Toxic Inheritance

The nation’s worst coal ash spill was scooped up from a prosperous community and dumped across state lines into the lives of a low-income community. But Alabama's Perry County is fighting back.

Pages