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Air Toxics: Mercury & Power Plants

The Latest On: Air Toxics: Mercury & Power Plants

November 1, 2011 | Blog Post

They Took Our Jobs! (Not)

Today, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA)—that's "Ice-uh" for those unfamiliar with the congressman—ran a hearing in the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee about pollution from coal-fired power plants.

July 29, 2011 | Blog Post

Protecting Polluters, Not People, One Rider at a Time

The Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, FY 2012 (H.R. 2584) is chock-full of riders that protect polluters, not people. This bill makes excessive budget cuts and policy decisions that compromise public health, especially the health of environmental justice communities already disproportionately impacted by pollution. The outrageous cuts have brought together more than 70 groups on a letter to outright oppose H.R.

May 19, 2011 | Blog Post

Life, Liberty and the Right to Breathe

Nobody gets through a day without breathing. Not executives in the coal-fired power and cement industries, which are polluting our air daily. Not the legion of lobbyists they hire to patrol the halls of Congress in defense of dirty air. And not the members of Congress who, hand-in-hand with these special interests, are marching the Clean Air Act off a cliff.

At the very same time that these women and men draw breath, they are working to derail and delay clean air protections with a vigor that suggests there isn't a set of functioning lungs between them.

May 5, 2011 | Feature

50 States United For Healthy Air: Photo Gallery

Clean air should be a fundamental right. Every year, many Americans young and old get sick because of air pollution. Thousands die. But our bodies don't have to be the dumping ground for dirty industries. The Clean Air Ambassadors traveled to Washington, D.C. to defend our right to breathe. Hear their voices and read their stories.

April 14, 2011 | Blog Post

25,000 Lives Don't Matter Much to Them

Today, another indication comes that some members of Congress don't breathe the same air as their constituents. Politico is reporting (subs. req'd) that House Republicans will soon introduce legislation to delay the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's efforts to reduce the amount of cancer-causing, asthma-inducing, premature death-dealing pollutants in the air we all breathe—some congresspersons excepted, apparently.

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