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Canada Lynx Critical Habitat Intervention

The Latest On: Canada Lynx Critical Habitat Intervention

July 17, 2014 | Photos

Images from the Crown of the Continent

The Crown of the Continent ecosystem serves as a critical refuge for grizzly bears, wolverines, and more. Conservationist Gene Sentz shares his photos of the ten-million acre expanse of land whose untouched wilderness harkens back to the days of Lewis & Clark.

April 16, 2011 | Feature

Irreplaceable: Wildlife in a Warming World

Climate change is impacting wildlife the world over. Earthjustice partnered in a photo exhibit for which photographers from the International League of Conservation Photographers took incredible photos to showcase some of the irreplaceable wildlife in harm’s way.

March 25, 2011 | Feature

Crown of the Continent: Taming the Wild West

The "Crown of the Continent" ecosystem is one of the largest undeveloped landscapes remaining in the country, containing some of the most spectacular scenery and intact wildlife populations in the United States. But climate change is now dramatically altering this region, one of America's last wild places.

September 11, 2009 | Case

Canada Lynx Critical Habitat Intervention

The Canada lynx is a secretive forest cat that needs big, wild landscapes to survive. In February 2009, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acted to conserve this rare species by designating 39,000 square miles of forest land as critical habitat for the lynx pursuant to the Endangered Species Act. The critical habitat designation, which encompasses lands in Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Minnesota, and Maine, allows the Service to protect lynx from harmful activities within areas that are crucial for the species' survival and recovery.