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Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Supreme Court.

For the third time since 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court has confirmed that the Environmental Protection Agency has the authority under the Clean Air Act to limit carbon pollution that is contributing to climate change.

In announcing the court's opinion Monday, Justice Antonin Scalia said, “It bears mention that EPA is getting almost everything it wanted in this case.”

Child at a lake.

Hundreds of thousands of concerned citizens, including nearly 40,000 Earthjustice supporters, weighed in over the past few weeks on a rule jointly proposed by the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers that would restore long-standing Clean Water Act protections and provide clarity to the jurisdiction of this law that keeps toxic pollutants out of our cherished water sources.

Navajo Generating Station in Page, AZ. (Ecoflight)

We expected strong opposition to the Environmental Protection Agency's proposal for slashing emissions from the nation’s dirty power plants—the biggest contributors to climate change. But two weeks after the Obama administration rolled out its plan, the strongest reaction, so far, is from America’s people.

Packages of d-CON on store shelves.

Some of the gravest poisoning threats to children, pets and wildlife will disappear because of agreements reached this month by Earthjustice and its allies.

The 12 most-dangerous d-CON rodenticides will soon be gone from retail shelves. After years of pressure from conservation, public-health and animal-rights groups, d-CON’s manufacturer agreed to stop producing its super-toxic rat poisons and pull the products from store shelves by early next year. This should greatly reduce unintentional poisonings of children, pets and wildlife.

Today, because of unrelenting pressure from so many people who have demanded action on climate change, the Obama administration proposed the nation’s first-ever carbon pollution limits on existing power plants—the single biggest source of climate pollution.

Just getting this rule proposed has taken years of effort, and we are thankful for all of our supporters who sent messages urging our public officials to address climate change

Carbon limits for power plants are vitally important for a few key reasons:

Supreme Court columns reach up toward a blue sky.

Over the last few weeks, the nation’s federal courts—including the U.S. Supreme Court—have blessed Americans with four major clean air victories that will save tens of thousands of lives and allow millions of us to live healthier. Some of these achievements came only after years of struggle by Earthjustice and our allies.

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About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.