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In just a few days, parts of the island nation of Tuvalu will be inundated with ocean water, forcing many residents to flee for higher ground—if they can find it in this remarkably low-lying land.

This is not unusual by the way. It happens annually and is known as the "king tides" period because these are the highest tides of the year.

Thousands of jobs linked to the decline of Sacramento River salmon have been lost—but big agricultural interests in California are stepping up political efforts that may permanently extinguish salmon and the industries they support.

Even without this latest assault, the future of California's king salmon is in doubt. Salmon runs are at all time lows, due in large part to water pumps in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta that suck baby salmon in and kill them. The water is going to agricultural operators south of San Francisco Bay—and now they want more.

The current issue of the venerable Columbia Journalism Review has a fascinating cover story that goes some way toward explaining why people's understanding of climate change is so, well, skimpy, if not downright biased or wrong. It all has to do with your local TV weatherman or –woman.

Just south of Burlington, Vermont, the residents of the Wake Robin retirement community came together recently to share memories of living in leaner times. Driven more by survival instincts than environmental concern, the experiences of our elders provide valuable lessons in green living.

Luckily, Burlington Free Press reporter Matt Sutkoski was there to record the proceedings.

In his 2010 State of the Union speech, President Obama delivered an impressive salvo to our overseas peers:

There is no reason that Europe or China should have the fastest trains.

And with that, he seemed to have kick-started America into the race to develop the high-speed rail systems of the future. Except that in Europe and China, the future is already here.

There are only about 400 right whales in existence at the moment. Which means the loss of just one of these creatures could contribute to the overall extinction of the entire species.

That's why Earthjustice joined with several groups to challenge the U.S. Navy's decision to build it's $100 million Undersea Warfare Training Range in the calving ground for the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale. The range would be 50 miles east of Jacksonville, Florida. This is the only known calving range for right whales. In total, 14 conservation groups are protesting this training range.

We're asking the Navy and the National Marine Fisheries Service to study the impacts of building and operating the training range in this location. The Navy has moved forward with this plan despite protests from Earthjustice and other groups. But we plan to challenge this plan—and protect right whales as best we can.
 

Last November I blogged (blog isn't even a word and now it's a verb?) about the treadmill that Roundup and other agricultural chemicals represent. That is, no matter how slick your latest miracle chemical fix, nature will find a way around it, will evolve, in this case, better weeds to fend off the effects of the new poison.

Now a new study (heavy going unless you're a chemist), ironically funded by Monsanto itself, has confirmed the earlier findings. The Organic Center has translated the findings into English. It all seems to come down to the lesson that it's better to consider nature our friend and find ways to work cooperatively rather than think of nature as the enemy and find better ways to do battle.

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About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.