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Thank you.

During this time of transition and change, we at Earthjustice would like to take a moment to reflect on all we’ve accomplished together in the last year. With you by our side, we secured more than 50 victories safeguarding our national treasures, defending imperiled wildlife, advancing clean energy and fighting back against corporate polluters.

None of this would have been possible without people like you getting involved. Our lawyers, our advocates, our storytellers are all powered by your faith in us to keep fighting. As we look to the challenges that lie ahead, I want to thank everyone for fighting alongside us and helping to win these landmark cases. Your voice helps Earthjustice stand ready to fight the good fights today and into the future.

Your partnership made these victories—and so much more—possible. Thank you for your support and friendship.

Protecting The Grand Canyon
A light dusting of snow covers the Grand Canyon on a New Year's Day.
Michael Quinn / National Park Service
A light dusting of snow covers the Grand Canyon on a New Year's Day.
Laura wrote:
“I first visited the Grand Canyon in my early 20s, many years ago. Please reject this proposed development and protect this national treasure so that my child and generations to come can experience the same peace and awe that I experienced many years ago.”
Laura was among 55,585 Earthjustice members who called on the U.S. Forest Service to turn down a proposal that would have paved the way for a sprawling urban development near the southern entrance of Grand Canyon National Park. The proposal was rejected in March.

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Safeguarding Southwestern Wolves
Rebecca Bose, the curator at the Wolf Conservation Center in New York, holds F1505.
Photo courtesy of Michael Rubenstein
Rebecca Bose, the curator at the Wolf Conservation Center in New York, holds F1505. WCC participates in a recovery program for the Mexican gray wolf, working to prevent the total extinction of the species.
Joy wrote:
“As someone who lives in Arizona, I feel it is vitally important that politics not get in the way of science. It is vital for the sake of this species. These wolves have a right to exist as they always have; they are a part of the Southwest. Please, Governor Ducey, do the right thing. We are the stewards of this beautiful state we live in. Don’t let this species disappear; don’t let special interest groups dissuade you in this matter. You know in your heart what the right thing to do is. Do the right thing. Thank you.”
Joy’s was among 106,702 letters sent by Earthjustice members to their local and federal elected officials and to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, expressing their support for one of the most endangered mammals in North America: the Mexican gray wolf. These wolves are the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere. Only 97 of them remain in the wild today.

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Defending Clean Energy
A technician services a wind turbine in Colorado.
Dennis Schroeder / NREL
A technician services a wind turbine in Colorado.
Patricia wrote:
“As an RN for 35 years, I can tell you from experience the effect of air pollution with asthma and related lung problems [is] up over 800%. Please help your children and grandchildren grow up on a beautiful planet so they can walk, hike and canoe and enjoy their life not attached to inhalers, medication and even breathing machines. Please take a bold step forward.”
48,464 Earthjustice members joined Patricia in writing or calling in their support for the Clean Power Plan, which sets the first-ever federal carbon pollution limits for our nation's electric power plants. The result will be a significant dent in the U.S.’s largest source of carbon emissions and in smog and soot, preventing premature deaths and hospitalizations for respiratory illnesses.

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Cleaning Up Dirty Air
The Cheswick Generating Station rises over the city of Springdale, Pennsylvania.
Chris Jordan-Bloch / Earthjustice
The Cheswick Generating Station rises over the city of Springdale, Pennsylvania.
Mary Lou wrote:
“As an asthmatic myself, and a clinician who has worked with many children with respiratory illnesses, I feel compelled to speak out about the terrible costs of toxic air pollution. Apart from its life-threatening aspect, it costs this country millions, if not billions, in lost productivity, healthcare costs, etc. Please use your power to stop this willful destruction!”
Mary Lou was among 21,402 Earthjustice members who supported efforts to place limits on emissions of mercury, lead, cadmium, hydrochloric acid, and other toxic air pollutants from coal-fired power plants, the largest source of toxic air pollution in the country. These health protections took effect last April and are reducing Americans’ exposure to toxic pollution right now. Yet, some states and industry groups were still fighting these protections, hoping to allow power generators to turn off the life-saving pollution-control equipment they’ve already installed. Earthjustice has battled for these protections in court for more than fifteen years, side-by-side with a large coalition of clients and partners. We stand ready to continue the fight.

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Saving Yellowstone National Park
The Cheswick Generating Station rises over the city of Springdale, Pennsylvania.
Photo courtesy of William Campbell
The locally-owned Chico Hot Springs Resort is one of hundreds of businesses that called for the mineral withdrawal. Emigrant Peak and the Emigrant Gulch proposed mining area are behind the resort. There are mine claims on both sides of the gulch on both private and public land.
Patrick wrote:
“As a Republican and small business owner, I am also an avid supporter of our parks and hold the greater Yellowstone region dear for its ecological importance and beauty. Please do all you can to protect it!”
42,011 Earthjustice members joined Patrick in working to protect public lands within the northern gateway to Yellowstone National Park from large-scale gold mines. On Nov. 21, the Interior Department and Agricultural Department announced a two-year time-out on gold exploration activity.

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