Irreplaceable: Wildlife in a Warming World

Feature:
Irreplaceable Wildlife in A Warming World
Graphic of irreplacable species, emperor penguin.
We are connected to each other, to our environment. From faraway places to our own backyard. But climate change is now changing the Earth as we know it, and animals and plants from the Arctic to the Everglades are feeling the consequences.
Key Resources:

Moose

While a member of the deer family, the impressive moose is far from delicate. Sporting the largest antlers in the world, a moose can be more than six feet tall at the shoulder and weigh 1,800 pounds.
Photo Credit:
James Balog / ILCP (Part of Irreplaceable Wildlife Photo Exhibit)
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Moose

Scientific Name: 
Alces alces
IUCN Red List: 
No data
Endangered Species Act List: 
No data

One of the largest members of the deer family, the sight of a full-grown bull moose can be intimidating! Sporting the largest antlers in the world, a moose can be more than six feet tall at the shoulder and weigh 1,800 pounds. Luckily, this herbivore is generally not aggressive or territorial towards humans unless it is provoked or separated from its calf. Given their imposing size, adult moose have few enemies except for wolves and grizzlies.

Climate Change Impacts

Warming temperatures have led to an explosion of white-tailed deer population in northern Minnesota, which carry a parasitic worm that is deadly to moose. The worm damages the moose’s central nervous system, leaving it weak, disoriented and susceptible to predation. Global warming is also allowing dog ticks to expand northward in Maine, which hurts the moose population of the Northeast.

Irreplaceable in Your Neighborhood

The Earthjustice traveling photo exhibit, Irreplaceable: Wildlife in a Warming World, is available to bring education, scholarship and research to your community. For more information on booking the exhibit, including fees, exhibit specifications, requirements and descriptions, please contact Nadine de Coteau at 1-800-584-6460.