Campaign:
Right to Breathe
Photo of clean air.
Clean air should be a fundamental right. Every year, many Americans young and old get sick because of air pollution. Thousands die. But our lungs don’t have to be the dumping ground for dirty industries.
Key Resources:
Subscribe to Earthjustice
   Please leave this field empty

Sick Of Soot

The report, Sick Of Soot, was prepared by the American Lung Association, Clean Air Task Force and Earthjustice.

It summarizes the findings of Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards, a technical report that was prepared for the American Lung Association, Clean Air Task Force and Earthjustice by Donald McCubbin, Ph.D.

Report Prepared By:
American Lung Association American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease through education, advocacy and research.
http://www.lungusa.org
Clean Air Task Force Clean Air Task Force is a nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing atmospheric pollution through research, advocacy and private sector collaboration.
http://www.catf.us
Earthjustice Earthjustice is a nonprofit public interest law firm dedicated to protecting the magnificent places, natural resources and wildlife of this earth, and to defending the right of all people to a healthy environment.
http://earthjustice.org
Update:

On December 14, 2012, the EPA adopted protections that will slash the amount of soot allowed in our air, improving air quality for millions of Americans.

This move by the EPA comes in response to legal action filed by Earthjustice on behalf of the American Lung Association and the National Parks Conservation Association asking that the EPA follow the Clean Air Act’s requirements to protect the public’s health and well-being.

The EPA’s proposal is slightly below the strongest recommended levels, but is nonetheless an important step towards cleaner, healthier air.

Report Photos
A resident of California's Central Valley -- notorious for its problems with particulate matter pollution -- calls on the EPA to protect public health at a clean air rally that coincided with EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson's visit to the area.
Ana Corona takes medication for her asthma while her daughter watches.
Marlene Duran of Arvin, California, holds the hand of her daughter Mariann, 5, while she takes her asthma medication.
Ana Corona takes medication for her asthma while her daughter watches.
Report Documents

Report:
Sick Of Soot: How The EPA Can Save Lives By Cleaning Up Fine Particle Air Pollution

Press Release:
35,700 Deaths Could Be Prevented Annually By Strong Soot Standards

Blog Post:
The Nation Is Sick of Soot

Legal Actions:

1.  In early 2009, following an Earthjustice lawsuit, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit found that the EPA's current soot standards do not adequately protect public health and ordered the agency to update them.

On November 16, 2011, after several years of inaction by the EPA, Earthjustice petitioned the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on behalf of several public health and environmental groups to set a deadline for the EPA to issue stronger soot standards.

Press Release:
Environmentalists, Health Groups and State Governments Seek Court-Ordered Deadline for New Air Pollution Standards for Soot

Legal Document:
PM NAAQS Mandamus Petition

Legal Document:
States' Petition for Writ of Mandamus

2.  On October 18, 2011, Earthjustice sent the EPA a notice of intent to sue giving the agency 60 days to address its failure to conduct a mandatory five-year review of the current soot standards, set in 2006.

Press Release:
Groups Act to Force EPA to Issue Soot Air Pollution Standards

Legal Document:
Notice of Intent Letter

Related Audio

In July 2012, members of the public shared personal and emotional testimony at a public hearing in Sacramento, CA, focused on EPA's recent proposal to further limit emissions of deadly air pollution.

Listen to attorney Paul Cort's comments in an episode of Earthjustice’s environmental news podcast, EJ90:

Related Videos
Watch Tom Frantz's video.
Watch 'Asthma Feels'.
Watch '50 States United For Health Air' teaser video.
Watch 'The Right To Breathe' video.
Technical Analysis:

Sick Of Soot summarizes the findings of Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards, a technical report that was prepared for the American Lung Association, Clean Air Task Force and Earthjustice by Donald McCubbin, Ph.D.

Dr. Donald McCubbin has analyzed the health benefits of the Clean Air Act, major regulations such as the Heavy-Duty Diesel Rule and the Clean Air Interstate Rule, and the impacts of power plants, motor vehicles and other pollution sources.

He received the EPA's Level 1 Science and Technological Achievement Award for work on the health benefits of alternative ozone standards and he received Abt Associates' Daniel Bell Award for the development of the Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP).


Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards

Acknowledgments:
John Graham, Ph.D., an atmospheric scientist at Clean Air Task Force, served as project manager in the production of Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards.

Research for Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards was made possible by the generous support of the Energy Foundation.
Photo Credits:
All photos by Chris Jordan-Bloch / Earthjustice unless otherwise noted.
The Clean Air Act requires that the EPA protect public health with an adequate margin of safety. The EPA must soon update national health standards for fine particulate matter air pollution—a major cause of premature death.
The microscopic size of soot, also known as fine particulate matter, allows it to lodge deep within the lung. Diesel vehicles and equipment and coal-fired power plants are among the biggest sources of this pollution.
Meeting the health standard recommended by this report could prevent as many as 35,700 premature deaths every year. Despite recent improvements to air quality, soot still poses a major threat to public health.
Particle pollution does not just make people die a few days earlier than they might otherwise—these are deaths that would not have occurred if the air were cleaner.
"Because children spend more time outdoors than do adults, they have increased exposure to outdoor air pollution."  – American Academy of Pediatrics
Given the mandate to protect public health, it is clear that the EPA must set standards providing the greatest protection. Download: Sick Of Soot: How The EPA Can Save Lives By Cleaning Up Fine Particle Air Pollution
How The EPA Can Save Lives By Cleaning Up Fine Particle Air Pollution
Excerpt From Report:

Introduction

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must soon update national health standards for fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5), commonly referred to as soot—a major cause of premature death and a widespread threat to those who suffer from lung and heart disease. The national health standards are critical tools that drive the cleanup of soot pollution across the country.

According to the EPA, fine particle pollution:

  • Causes early death (from both short- and long-term exposure);
  • Causes cardiovascular harm (e.g., heart attacks, stroke, heart disease, congestive heart failure);
  • Likely causes respiratory harm (e.g., worsened asthma, worsened COPD, inflammation);
  • May cause cancer; and
  • May cause developmental and reproductive harm.

The EPA will choose an updated national health standard from a range of possible options. In April 2011, staff scientists at the EPA made a series of recommendations to Administrator Lisa Jackson. These recommendations were based on a review of current research on the health effects of PM2.5, conducted by the EPA National Center for Environmental Assessment and vetted by the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC), an independent body that offers technical advice to the EPA on ambient air quality standards. Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards, a new analysis prepared for the American Lung Association, Clean Air Task Force and Earthjustice, examines these and other options and estimates the life- and costsaving potential for each scenario of reduced soot pollution.

Based on the analysis, the options currently under consideration at the EPA are not strong enough to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety. These organizations recommend that the EPA adopt a health standard at the strongest end of the range of options considered by the analysis—an annual standard of 11 micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3) and a daily standard of 25 μg/m3.

Meeting this standard could prevent as many as 35,700 premature deaths every year, in addition to delivering major reductions in harm to people with heart and respiratory disease. Overall, the nation could benefit by as much as $281 billion every year from reduced costs associated with premature death and disease.

The Clean Air Act requires the EPA to follow science and protect public health. To comply with the law, it should adopt the PM2.5 health standard recommended by this report.

Findings And Recommendations

If the EPA strengthens the current standard of 15 μg/m3 annually and a daily limit of 35 μg/m3 to the recommendation of this report—an annual limit of 11 μg/m3 and a daily limit of 25 μg/m3—the analysis predicts that, every year, Americans will be spared from as many as:

  • 35,700 premature deaths;
  • 2,350 heart attacks;
  • 23,290 visits to the hospital and emergency room;
  • 29,800 cases of acute bronchitis;
  • 1.4 million cases of aggravated asthma; and
  • 2.7 million days of missed work or school due to air pollution-caused ailments.

These health benefits—which are estimates based on improvements relative to current air quality conditions—far outweigh the benefits from any standard the EPA is currently considering.

Report Figures
Recommended PM2.5 Health Standard Prevents More Premature Deaths Annually
Recommended PM2.5 Health Standard Provides Greater Economic Benefits Annually
Metropolitan Areas That Will Benefit Most From The Recommended PM2.5 Standard In Premature Deaths Avoided

Overall, the number of premature deaths that could be avoided every year from the most protective standard is equivalent to the size of a sold-out crowd at Fenway Park, Boston's historic baseball stadium. The same epidemiological study used in Figures 1, 2 and 3 found that the current standard—15 μg/m3 (annual) and 35 μg/m3 (daily)—could prevent up to 5,240 premature deaths every year. Strengthening the soot standard to 13 μg/m3 (annual) and 35 μg/m3 (daily), the weakest option that the EPA is considering, could prevent 2,950 additional premature deaths and be important progress. Yet, adopting the standard recommended by this report could prevent an additional 30,460 premature deaths every year—more than 10 times the current number. To maximize the potential of these important health protections to prevent premature death and illness, it is clear that the EPA must set a strong soot standard of 11 μg/m3 (annual) and 25 μg/m3 (daily).

The health benefits bring major financial benefits as well. Strengthening the annual PM2.5 standard to 11 μg/m3 and the daily standard to 25 μg/m3 will lead to economic benefits for the American public of $281 billion every year from reduced costs associated with premature death and disease.

While health benefits will be distributed across the nation, 10 major metropolitan areas stand to benefit significantly.

To estimate these health and economic benefits, recent air quality data from the EPA's monitoring network were incorporated into the same computer modeling program that the agency uses in its own regulatory impact analyses. This analysis, however, goes beyond the findings published in the EPA's Quantitative Health Risk Assessment for Particulate Matter in several important respects:

  • It is national in scope. The EPA's analysis only focuses on 15 urban areas in the continental U.S.
  • It examines a wider range of daily and annual health standard combinations than the EPA has considered.
  • It uses more current data. The air quality monitoring data used in this report comes from 2007–2009, whereas the EPA risk assessment, which was completed in 2010, relied on older data from 2005–2007. The more current data used in this report are closer to today's actual air quality conditions. Air quality has improved considerably in recent years due to a number of factors, including cleaner cars entering the fleet and the economic downturn. Consequently, it should be easier for the nation to meet the health standard recommended by this report because current conditions are in fact closer to that standard than the EPA's older modeling has shown.

Summary

The EPA is required by the Clean Air Act to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety. To do so, the agency should strengthen the national standard for fine particulate matter to an annual standard of 11 μg/m3 coupled with a daily standard of 25 μg/m3. This standard could prevent as many as 35,700 premature deaths every year, significantly more than any of the standards that the EPA is currently considering. It will also prevent illness, tens of thousands of hospital visits and millions of days of lost productivity, while providing up to $281 billion annually in benefits associated with reducing premature death and disease.

Download Full Report:

Sick Of Soot: How The EPA Can Save Lives By Cleaning Up Fine Particle Air Pollution

Download Technical Analysis:

Health Benefits of Alternative PM2.5 Standards