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White-fronted geese fly near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska, in the Western Arctic, May 2019.

White-fronted geese fly near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska, in the Western Arctic. (Kiliii Yüyan for Earthjustice)

Earthjustice explores.

Explore: Alaska’s Arctic

An At Home Adventure

Explore: Alaska’s Arctic
An At Home Adventure

White-fronted geese fly near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska, in the Western Arctic, May 2019.
Kiliii Yüyan for Earthjustice
White-fronted geese fly near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska, in the Western Arctic.

Journey to Alaska’s Arctic and immerse yourself in one of the last intact ecosystems of the world. From the comfort of your own home, you’ll travel to the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge, a place held sacred by the Gwich’in people as the place where life begins and widely cherished for extraordinary wildlife and natural beauty.

In the Arctic, oil and gas development threaten the tremendous biodiversity and way of life that has existed there for millennia. Earthjustice’s Alaska-based attorneys are working with a broad coalition of partners to end oil and gas activities in the federal lands of the Arctic, which includes the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska, and the federal offshore waters of the Arctic Ocean.

The Explore Alaska’s Arctic: An At Home Adventure box, displayed open with a spread of itinerary cards, an orange Earthjustice bandana, a candle, a photo booklet, and a VR headset.

Explore Alaska’s Arctic: An At Home Adventure is a physical box that provides a portal into a highly participatory, immersive, multi-sensory experience. This living room journey goes far beyond Zoom or watching a documentary. Upon opening a box that is delivered right to your doorstep, you will be guided through a series of experiences.

You’ll feel transported to the starkly beautiful North Alaskan coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge, an Iñupiaq village and a Gwich’in village, the Western Arctic, and the epicenter of oil and gas drilling in Alaska’s Arctic. You’ll hear travel stories from Michael Wald, conservation activist and co-owner of Arctic Wild. Feel inspired by the stories and images from Kiliii Yüyan, a prized National Geographic photographer who elevates Arctic Indigenous perspectives through his powerful photography. Sip on an Arctic inspired cocktail as Earthjustice staff tell behind-the-scenes stories and learn what it means for the earth to have a good lawyer.

By the end of this interactive, multi-sensory experience you’ll feel the power of travel without ever packing a bag. Connect with Earthjustice staff and partners who share your passions, indulge in a new multisensory experience, and feel the power of advocating, together, for the right of all to a healthy environment.

Highlights:

Take a virtual reality journey to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Hear Earthjustice staff and experts’ stories about traveling in the Western Arctic.

Engage with local Alaskan items transporting your senses to the Arctic.

Soak up the scenery and stories from your home.

Itinerary:

This virtual trip goes beyond what you would experience using Zoom or watching a documentary. This trip is designed to take you out of your living room and immerse you in the beauties, wonder, and history of this special place. The activities are designed to foster connections with the region and Earthjustice’s work:

Upon Purchase:

With your order, you’ll receive a travel package sent directly to your doorstep. This package will serve as your portal to Alaska’s Arctic! Inside, you’ll find all the essentials for your at-home adventure, including a VR Headset, souvenirs, a recipe for an Arctic inspired cocktail or mocktail, and small surprises to immerse you in your journey!

Orient yourself
to the vast region of Alaska’s Arctic

Open the map provided in your package and lay it out on your table. Call the number on your map to meet Erik Grafe, Deputy Managing Attorney of Earthjustice’s Alaska office. He will help give you a lay of the land and orient you to the different areas you’ll hear about throughout your journey.

Become immersed
with Virtual Reality

Using the virtual reality headset provided in your package, watch Earthjustice’s produced film Too Wild to Drill to meet some people from the Gwich’in Steering Committee, who will tell you about the significance of the Coastal Plain of the Arctic Refuge. Afterwards, give Rebecca Bowe, Earthjustice’s Communications Strategist for the Northwest and Alaska offices, a call to hear behind-the-scenes stories of how the film was produced.

Experience the Arctic
through the eyes of a renowned photographer

Kiliii Yüyan, a renowned National Geographic photographer, uses his work and Nanai/ Hèzhé (Siberian Native) and Chinese-American ancestry to explore the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives. Listen to Kiliii’s stories as he guides you through a photobook he designed for you, based on his personal experiences in the Arctic.

Alter your perception
of time and senses

Hear from Michael Wald, a conservation activist and co-owner of Arctic Wild, as he describes how he feels unbound from his senses and perception of time as he travels through the Arctic. Follow Michael through audio and visual stories as he demonstrates what happens when you are free to explore in a region where the sun never sets.

A vision
for change

Earthjustice’s goal is to end oil and gas exploration in all areas of the Arctic. Give Eric Jorgensen, Managing Attorney of the Alaska office, a call to learn more about how Earthjustice is holding the line, proactively fighting for increased protections, and what you can do to help.

Highlights:
  • Take a virtual reality journey to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Hear Earthjustice staff and experts’ stories about traveling in the Western Arctic.
  • Engage with local Alaskan items transporting your senses to the Arctic.
  • Soak up the scenery and stories from your home.
Itinerary:

This virtual trip goes beyond what you would experience using Zoom or watching a documentary. This trip is designed to take you out of your living room and immerse you in the beauties, wonder, and history of this special place. The activities are designed to foster connections with the region and Earthjustice’s work:

Upon Purchase:
The Brooks Range, Takahula Lake, and Alatna River, seen from the air, in the Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve, August 2019.
The Brooks Range, Takahula Lake, and Alatna River, seen from the air, in the Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve, August 2019.

With your order, you’ll receive a travel package sent directly to your doorstep. This package will serve as your portal to Alaska’s Arctic! Inside, you’ll find all the essentials for your at-home adventure, including a VR Headset, souvenirs, a recipe for an Arctic inspired cocktail or mocktail, and small surprises to immerse you in your journey!

Orient yourself to the vast region of Alaska’s Arctic
A herd of caribou near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska. Traveling single-file saves energy so each caribou does not need to break its own trail.
A herd of caribou near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska. Traveling single-file saves energy so each caribou does not need to break its own trail.

Open the map provided in your package and lay it out on your table. Call the number on your map to meet Erik Grafe, Deputy Managing Attorney of Earthjustice’s Alaska office. He will help give you a lay of the land and orient you to the different areas you’ll hear about throughout your journey.

Become immersed with Virtual Reality
A caribou near Lake Teshekpuk, Alaska, May 2019.
Kiliii Yüyan for Earthjustice
A caribou near Lake Teshekpuk Alaska.

Using the virtual reality headset provided in your package, watch Earthjustice’s produced film Too Wild to Drill to meet some people from the Gwich’in Steering Committee, who will tell you about the significance of the Coastal Plain of the Arctic Refuge. Afterwards, give Rebecca Bowe, Earthjustice’s Communications Strategist for the Northwest and Alaska offices, a call to hear behind-the-scenes stories of how the film was produced.

Experience the Arctic through the eyes of a renowned photographer
An arctic tern surfaces after fishing in the waters of the Qupaluk wetland area. The Arctic tern has the longest migration on earth, traveling from the Antarctic to the Arctic, over 44,000 miles annually to nest on the Alaskan tundra.
An arctic tern surfaces after fishing in the waters of the Qupaluk wetland area. The Arctic tern has the longest migration on earth, traveling from the Antarctic to the Arctic, over 44,000 miles annually to nest on the Alaskan tundra.

Kiliii Yüyan, a renowned National Geographic photographer, uses his work and Nanai/ Hèzhé (Siberian Native) and Chinese-American ancestry to explore the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives. Listen to Kiliii’s stories as he guides you through a photobook he designed for you, based on his personal experiences in the Arctic.

Alter your perception of time and senses
An unusual phenomenon known as a sun pillar forms between above the sea ice on the Chukchi Sea. This type of refraction is only seen when the air is filled with ice crystals.
An unusual phenomenon known as a sun pillar forms between above the sea ice on the Chukchi Sea. This type of refraction is only seen when the air is filled with ice crystals.

Hear from Michael Wald, a conservation activist and co-owner of Arctic Wild, as he describes how he feels unbound from his senses and perception of time as he travels through the Arctic. Follow Michael through audio and visual stories as he demonstrates what happens when you are free to explore in a region where the sun never sets.

A vision for change
A migratory bird with outstretchd wings flies above two eggs resting on a nest on the ground. A field of grass stretches the horizon with a light blue sky above. Photo taken in and around the Lake Teshekpuk area in Western Arctic.
Kiliii Yüyan for Earthjustice
Migratory birds in the Lake Teshekpuk area of the Western Arctic.

Earthjustice’s goal is to end oil and gas exploration in all areas of the Arctic. Give Eric Jorgensen, Managing Attorney of the Alaska office, a call to learn more about how Earthjustice is holding the line, proactively fighting for increased protections, and what you can do to help.

Trip Details
While your time embarking on this trip is designed to be almost screen-free, access to a smartphone will allow you to fully experience this adventure. The journey also involves audio storytelling over the phone. If you are sensitive to scents and fragrances, you may also choose to forego the candle included in your package and gift it to a friend or family member.
Contact us: If you have questions, please contact our travel team travel@earthjustice.org or give us a call.
Matt Horst.
Matthew Horst
(312) 800-8308
Jamie Dobbs.
Jamie Dobbs
(415) 217-2030
Guides
Photographer Kiliii Yüyan stands in a field of white, dressed in a heavy fur-lined coat, carrying a backpack, with camera in hand.
Kiliii Yüyan National Geographic photographer
Photographer Kiliii Yüyan stands in a field of white, dressed in a heavy fur-lined coat, carrying a backpack, with camera in hand.
Kiliii Yüyan National Geographic photographer
Photographer Kiliii Yüyan illuminates the hidden stories of polar regions, wilderness and Indigenous communities. Informed by ancestry that is both Nanai/Hèzhé (Siberian Native) and Chinese-American, he explores the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives.
Kiliii has produced many stories on Arctic communities, including a multi-year National Geographic project on the subsistence culture of the Alaskan Iñupiaq, as well as stories on the Russian Chukchi and Greenland’s Iñuit community. He is currently at work on a global project covering Indigenous-led conservation. His public talks inspire others about photography, Indigenous perspectives and wilderness around the globe.
Kiliii is based out of Seattle, but can be found across the circumpolar Arctic much of the year.
Guide and Naturalist Michael Wald stands in a misty landscape, with water behind him. He is wearing a blue cap and rainjacket with his hands are tucked into his orange life vest.
Michael Wald Conservation Activist, Co-owner of Arctic Wild
Guide and Naturalist Michael Wald stands in a misty landscape, with water behind him. He is wearing a blue cap and rainjacket with his hands are tucked into his orange life vest.
Michael Wald Conservation Activist, Co-owner of Arctic Wild
Michael Wald has been leading wilderness trips since 1991, helping others understand and enjoy wild-lands from Alaska to Labrador to the Antarctic in all seasons. In addition to guiding, Michael has worked on research projects across arctic Alaska and taught science and outdoor education courses. His skills as a guide and naturalist bring many accolades to Arctic Wild.
In the winter Michael does the scheduling, booking, and logistics for Arctic Wild from the relative warmth of Haines, Alaska, where he and his wife Sally are raising their two growing boys.
When not exploring forest, ocean, or tundra he can be found working on a variety of Alaska conservation projects. He doesn’t like to sit still, but if you email him about a trip in the Arctic, he’ll write you right back!
Earthjustice Staff
Managing Attorney of the Earthjustice Alaska office Eric Jorgensen.
Eric Jorgensen Managing Attorney
Based in Juneau
Earthjustice Managing Attorney Eric Jorgensen inside a wooden kayak atop a body of water. He is wearing a blue jacket, blue cap, blue lifejacket, holding a wooden oar. Background of tall evergreen trees and snow capped mountains.
Eric Jorgensen Managing Attorney
Based in Juneau
Eric Jorgensen joined Earthjustice in 1984, and his practice has covered a wide range of issues, including safeguarding the old growth forest of the Tongass, protecting Alaska’s waters and salmon from polluting mines, and defending threatened wildlife in the North Pacific.
In the last 15 years, he has devoted a major portion of his work to protecting America’s Arctic from oil and gas drilling. First driven by the threats oil drilling poses to the fragile ecosystem of the Arctic and Alaska Native people whose way of life revolves around a healthy Arctic, and then inspired by the imperative to take action to combat climate change, Eric sees enforcing the laws to be a critical part of the fight to end the push for oil development and bring about a new vision for sustaining the Arctic.
One of the transformative experiences of his life took place on a long journey down a remote river in the Western Arctic, surrounded by thousands of migrating caribou, golden grizzly bears, solitary wolves, stoic musk ox, swift peregrine falcons and beautiful landscapes; he returned once again inspired and committed to the work of Earthjustice.
Through his work, Eric has seen the power of the law help make fundamental change happen across the state, and is thankful for the more than 30 years Earthjustice has given him to live and work in Alaska and protect its future.
Deputy Managing Attorney of the Earthjustice Alaska office Erik Grafe.
Erik Grafe Deputy Managing Attorney
Based in Anchorage
Deputy Managing Attorney of the Earthjustice Alaska office Erik Grafe. He is wearing an orange puff jacket, a grey beanie, and black gloves, beside him are two dogs. The landscape is snowy.
Erik Grafe Deputy Managing Attorney
Based in Anchorage
Erik Grafe has been with the Alaska regional office since 2007. His work focuses on the Arctic, working with conservation and Alaska Native groups to fend off attempts by oil companies and the federal government to open new lands to oil and gas operations in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, the Western Arctic, and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Arctic is one of the most obvious places on Earth to say ‘no’ to Big Oil and heed climate science that tells us we need to move rapidly away from fossil power, not expand it.
Erik has had the good fortune to travel in the Arctic in the past and establish relationships with some of the communities that call it home. What motivates him to do the work, however, is the intrinsic value of the place, its people, and its wildlife; whether one can visit or not, their existence matters.
What Erik loves best about living in the far north is that it is a place of constant change, particularly in the quality and quantity of the light and the comings and goings of birds and caribou and whales and salmon.
Communications Strategist for the Earthjustice Alaska regional office Rebecca Bowe on a glacier in the Kenai Peninsula.
Rebecca Bowe Communications Strategist
Based in Portland, Oregon
Communications Strategist for the Earthjustice Alaska regional office Rebecca Bowe on a glacier in the Kenai Peninsula.
Rebecca Bowe Communications Strategist
Based in Portland, Oregon
Rebecca Bowe is the Communications Strategist for Earthjustice’s Northwest and Alaska regional offices. Prior to Earthjustice she spent 11 years working as a professional journalist, including at KQED News and the San Francisco Bay Guardian, and continues to do occasional freelance reporting on environmental justice issues. Since stepping into her current role, Rebecca has had the good fortune of traveling to Alaska on multiple occasions for meetings with the Alaska team. In 2018, she produced a short film in virtual reality, called “Too Wild to Drill,” to inspire people to oppose oil and gas drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Rebecca resides in Oakland, California and has ventured out to public lands as often as possible since the pandemic began.
Artists
Britt’Nee Kivliqtaruq Brower is a strong proponent of Iñupiat values and their relevance in our modern age. She advocates the revitalization of the language, arts, story telling, and traditions of her Iñupiat culture, and brings this passion to her artwork. Her work explores the visual representation of the Iñupiat culture through qupak designs which are recognized as the geometric motifs on the trims of regalia. Her work in prints and children’s coloring books incorporates traditional qupak motifs and adds a modern twist to honor traditional elements of her culture. All of her artwork is made with intentions to teach about the Iñupiat culture, to help with cultural identity and cultural recognition for passing down indigenous knowledge and traditional skills to the future generation of culture bearers. She is passionate about her culture and revitalization, so she creates modern day jewelry that incorporates native materials throughout her work including fur, ivory, baleen, bone, fish skin leather, antler, and more. Each piece of jewelry is made to be one of a kind, unique to stand out, and to help create a sense of pride and identity as we represent our culture.
Klara Maisch sits on the floor barefooted. She is holding a paint palette in one hand and a paint brush in another. Behind her is a painting of snow. She is dressed in a grey beanie and paint splattered black overalls.
Klara Maisch Artist, Instructor, and Guide
Klara Maisch beside big blocks of ice. Green lensed sun glasses sit on the brim of the cap on her head. She has on a red jacket, orange gloves, a backpack, and is holding hiking poles.
Klara Maisch Artist, Instructor, and Guide
Klara Maisch is an artist, instructor, and guide who grew up in Fairbanks, Alaska — a place located on the traditional lands of the Dena people of the lower Tenana River. Through her experiences living in Alaska and guiding for Arctic Wild, navigating vast natural landforms has trained her to closely observe her surroundings that has, in turn, translated into her work. The backbone of her artistic process relies on information gathered in the field. Through this firsthand approach, Klara can respond to changes that occur within an environment over a period of time, empowering her to grasp the underlying structures of complex places.
Klara is passionate about developing cross-disciplinary ways of expression and thinking through art, science, and the outdoors. Her artwork, which includes sketches, paintings, and wood workings, has been featured in exhibits and public art commissions throughout Alaska, Washington, California, and Hawai’i.

About Earthjustice Explores

At Earthjustice, we go to court for the future of our planet. But we are more than just lawyers in a courtroom: Our litigation, advocacy, and communications work leads to real change on the ground. When you travel with us, you’ll experience firsthand how our legal wins matter profoundly for people and the environment, and see what it really means for the earth to have a good lawyer.

Each trip is an opportunity to connect with the heart of our cases. Accompanied by local experts, community advocates, and Earthjustice attorneys, you’ll explore major environmental and public health fights, immerse yourself in local culture, and create relationships with the magnificent places for which we fight.

We curate each trip to showcase our regional work through a balanced itinerary of adventure, hands-on learning opportunities, social hours, and downtime. You’ll build meaningful connections with fellow Earthjustice supporters and enjoy numerous opportunities for casual conversation with experts. After a day of learning and exploring, you’ll have a comfortable landing place to relax and reflect on your experiences from the day.

Our trips are priced only to cover expenses and are not intended to help fund our organization. We offer these trips to you as an opportunity to connect with our shared mission.

We invite you to explore with Earthjustice! Contact our travel team at travel@earthjustice.org.

CST 2142309-40; Fla. Seller of Travel Ref. No. ST42385