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In the News: KRBD February 27, 2024

Alaska Tribes accuse Canada of human rights violations, request international hearing on mining

Mae Manupipatpong, Attorney, International Program: “Toxic water pollution doesn’t stop at the Canadian border. And human rights obligations don’t either.”

View of the Tulsequah River, looking east towards the confluence with Taku River.
(Photo courtesy of Chris Miller / Trout Unlimited)
Press Release February 19, 2024

Alaska Tribes facing BC mining threat ask for international hearing

SEITC briefs the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights on Canada’s violations

After years of inaction by the federal government, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed long-overdue limits on six PFAS in drinking water. (Getty Images)
feature February 29, 2024

Inside EPA’s Roadmap on Regulating PFAS Chemicals

Toxic “forever chemicals” remain laxly regulated.

Oil drilling infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico. (Brad Zweerink for Earthjustice)
Press Release February 12, 2024

Environmental and Gulf Groups React to API Lawsuit Against Interior Dept. Targeting Five-Year Offshore Leasing Program; Seek Stronger Protections for Gulf of Mexico

As the oil industry pursues a max-out strategy for fossil fuel development in the Gulf with a new legal challenge, advocates flag serious climate, public health, and environmental concerns

North Antelope Rochelle Mine, Campbell County, Wyoming. (Ecoflight)
Press Release February 21, 2024

Ninth Circuit Decision Throws Out Coal Leasing Challenge

Northern Cheyenne Tribe and conservation groups urge Interior Department to act on coal

page January 8, 2024

Law Clerk Program

Earthjustice welcomes summer law clerks who share a passion for justice and a healthy environment. Only students who are currently enrolled in law school are eligible to apply.

The Hillcrest neighborhood, near “Refinery Row” in Corpus Christi, TX. (Eddie Seal for Earthjustice)
Press Release February 12, 2024

Corpus Christi Civil Rights and Fair Housing Complaint Referred to U.S. Department of Justice

An important step towards justice for a historically Black neighborhood

In the News: KRIS TV February 14, 2024

Corpus Christi Desalination: DOJ to review civil rights complaint

Erin Gaines, Attorney, Fossil Fuels Program: “The inner harbor desalination plant, which would be located in the Hillcrest, is just the latest example of this long-standing pattern of discrimination.”

Document February 12, 2024

Corpus Christi Civil Rights and Fair Housing Complaint: Referral to U.S. Department of Justice

Letter to city officials on a complaint under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act and the Fair Housing Act against the City of Corpus Christi, Texas for the proposed development of a desalination plant in a historically Black neighborhood being referred to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ).

Document February 12, 2024

Legal Challenge: Five-Year Offshore Leasing Program

Environmental groups and Gulf-based organizations filed a legal challenge to hold the Interior Department accountable for failing to adequately consider the public health impacts on frontline communities in its final Five-Year Program.

Homes are adjacent to a Shell refinery in Norco, Louisiana. (Brad Zweerink / Earthjustice)
Press Release January 23, 2024

Federal Court Deals Major Blow to Environmental Civil Rights Enforcement

U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana ruling restricts EPA and DOJ from protecting Louisiana communities from disparate environmental impacts

Trucks and train cars carrying shipping containers line up at the Port of Oakland in California. (Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)
From the Experts February 22, 2024

A Common-sense Guide to Port Management: More people-centered policies, less pandering

The California State Assembly Select Committee on Ports and Goods Movement misses the mark by convening hearings on the impact of freight while focusing almost exclusively on industry needs.

Stikine River (Michael Penn)
Press Release September 21, 2023

Transboundary Mining in British Columbia May Violate Human Rights, Says Inter-American Commission

Petition from the Southeast Alaska Indigenous Transboundary Commission (SEITC) addresses Canada’s failure to regulate and prevent threats from large-scale mining operations in British Columbia

Press Release December 13, 2022

International Coalition Urges Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to Investigate Abuses from Industrial Meat, Egg, Dairy Facilities

The thematic hearing request is supported by 243 organizations, including petitioning groups from Argentina, Mexico, Chile, Ecuador, and the United States. The request urges the commission, which monitors human rights within the Organization of American States, to investigate human rights abuses resulting from the unchecked expansion of concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs, across the Americas.

Unuk River is one of the transboundary watersheds of southeast Alaska. (USGS)
Press Release January 30, 2024

Alaska Native Tribes Press B.C. for Rights Amid Reckless Gold Rush

Tlingit Tribes originating along the Unuk River want a say in risky mining proposals

An industrial hog facility in North Carolina. Hog feces and urine are flushed into open, unlined pits and then sprayed onto nearby fields. The practice leads to waste contaminating nearby waters, and drifting as "mist" onto neighboring properties.
(Photo courtesy of Friends of Family Farmers)
Press Release March 9, 2023

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to Hear Testimony Friday on Abuses at U.S. Factory Farms

The expansion of CAFOs, commonly known as factory farms, has caused a range of human rights abuses in the United States and across the American continents

In the News: KRBD February 2, 2024

Alaska Native Tribes pressure Canada for rights in Unuk River mining project

Ramin Pejan, Attorney, International Program: “The ownership of the Unuk River and the territory and the use of that river is integral to their culture, to their subsistence. It goes back thousands of years before these borders were in place.”

The NY Public Service Commission's decision fails to protect ratepayers and does not comply with the CLCPA. New York State is on a clear and legally-binding path to quickly transition to a fossil-fuel-free future that the PSC and state-licensed utilities cannot be permitted to ignore. (pkline / Getty Images)
From the Experts January 11, 2024

After New Yorkers faced a deluge of climate disasters this year, Governor Hochul needs to appoint climate champions to the Public Service Commission

Governor Hochul can, by carefully selecting her nominees, fully realize the PSC’s potential to serve New Yorkers by protecting consumers and reducing our reliance on fossil fuels.