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Right To Zero

The Latest On: Right To Zero

April 7, 2020 | In the News: Curbed

Breathe Cleaner Air Everywhere

Adrian Martinez, Attorney, California Regional Office, Earthjustice: The best climate strategy is to meet clean-air standards. That would be a fundamental shift from a combustion-focused society to zero-emissions everywhere.”

April 2, 2020 | Article

Enclaustrados En Un Centro de Envío de Amazon

La pandemia COVID-19 acelera las compras online. Pero sin fuertes protecciones de salud ambiental y responsabilidad corporativa, el comercio electrónico tiene un alto costo para la fuerza laboral y comunidades vulnerables.

March 16, 2020 | Letter

Comments on Changes to Proposed Advanced Clean Truck Regulation

This letter is a follow-up to CARB’s February 20th workshop on proposed changes to the Advanced Clean Truck Regulation. At the December 12th Board hearing, a groundswell of public commenters urged CARB not to squander the rule’s potential to alleviate one of the largest pollution burdens in frontline communities. Consequently, a majority of Board Members directed Staff to strengthen the rule, ensure its consistency with the State’s air and climate targets, and accelerate benefits for disadvantaged communities.

February 25, 2020 | In the News: Government Technology

Los Angeles Buys in to the Promise of the Electric Fire Truck

Adrian Martinez, Staff Attorney, California Office, Earthjustice: “Public-sector agencies help create markets. Because of their public nature, there’s not a proprietary motive. So information around charging and things like that would be readily transferred to other cities, as well as private fleets and other entities. They play a huge role in advancing this technology.”

February 2, 2020 | In the News: Digital Trends

Would you give up Amazon Prime shipping to save the planet?

Adrian Martinez, Attorney, California Regional Office, Earthjustice: “These airplanes and the equipment that it takes to run an airport have immense localized impacts in the communities next to those airports and along the shipping corridors. Their use of shipping is deeply concerning.”

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