Tell the Army Corps not to re-route the dangerous Line 5 pipeline

What's At Stake

For more than a decade, the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa has fought to remove the Line 5 oil pipeline from their homeland in northern Wisconsin. A federal judge recently ruled in their favor, agreeing that Enbridge is illegally trespassing on the Bad River Band’s reservation. However, Enbridge wants to re-route the pipeline to get around the reservation’s boundaries, keeping the oil and the profits flowing while putting the entire watershed and the people who depend on it in the path of a potentially devastating oil spill. 

Now, the Army Corps of Engineers is pushing the federal permitting process forward, without taking the time to understand the project’s dangers to state and Tribal waters. They released a weak and flawed environmental assessment that doesn’t even consider shutting down Line 5 as a reasonable alternative. The comment period is now open until August 4th, and we need you to take action. Please urge the Army Corps to conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement and reject the Line 5 re-route project. 

Enbridge’s proposed re-route is a risky gamble that doesn’t protect the Band or the rest of the Great Lakes from the threat of Line 5, which carries up to 23 million gallons of oil and gas each day. Studies show that shutting down Line 5 would have almost no impact on jobs, prices, or fuel supplies in Wisconsin. Yet an oil spill could wreck the region’s economy and devastate cultural practices for members of the Bad River Band, who have relied on the wild rice, the fish, and the watershed for hundreds of years. In a time of record-setting heat waves and floods, we cannot afford to invest in a risky fossil fuel project that endangers one of the nation’s most critical freshwater resources. Send a letter to the Army Corps today to oppose the Line 5 re-route project. 

Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Tribal Vice Chairman Patrick Bigboy, Senior Member Liz Arbuckle, and Tribal Chairman Robert Blanchard, left to right. Photos from Ashland, Wisconsin and the Bad River Reservation on March 22, 2024. (Jaida Grey Eagle for Earthjustice)
Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Tribal Vice Chairman Patrick Bigboy, Senior Member Liz Arbuckle, and Tribal Chairman Robert Blanchard, left to right. Photos from Ashland, Wisconsin and the Bad River Reservation on March 22, 2024. (Jaida Grey Eagle for Earthjustice)

22 Days Remain

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