Skip to main content
The 2018 Voting Guide  |  En Español
I voted. Election Day was Nov. 6.
It was a midterm election. All 435 House seats, 35 Senate seats, 36 state and three U.S. territory governors, many city mayors, and state and local measures were up for your vote.
On Nov. 6
What do the election results mean for the environment? Oversight on the administration’s actions, and environmental champions in Congressional leadership positions. Read the explainer
Every vote matters. A single vote can decide an election.

Elections, at all levels of government, can be extraordinarily close.

In 2016, only 16 votes separated the top two primary candidates for Arizona's 5th Congressional district. (A recount later expanded the lead to 27 votes.) And in 2010, only 193 votes separated Illinois gubernatorial primary candidates. In 1984, Indiana's 8th Congressional district seat was determined by four votes.

And, our nation's election history has seen many races determined by a single vote. Your vote matters — and so do the votes of your family, neighbors, and friends. Vote on Nov. 6!

Where do I vote on Tuesday, Nov. 6? At your designated polling location, which may have changed since you last voted. Find your location

It is important to go to your current, designated polling location, because other locations will not have your name on their voter roster. There are several ways to find your designated in-person polling place:

  • If you received a sample ballot in the mail, the address label section may include your polling location.

Polling locations are based on your voter registration address. They can be located in schools, fire stations, and even private homes. Your polling location is not permanent and may differ from election to election, for example, as a result of changes to precinct boundaries or number of registered voters.

If you do not go to your designated polling location, you may be able to vote by provisional ballot. All states, except Idaho, Minnesota, and New Hampshire, provide provisional ballots, which voters can request at polling places, for example, if their name cannot be found on the poll list. The reasons for accepting and the process for handling provisional ballots vary by state.

If the line is long, please remain in line. Polls will remain open as long as people began waiting in line before the poll's scheduled close time. Polling hours vary by location. They are generally open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

Three states — Colorado, Oregon, and Washington — hold all elections by mail and provide ballot drop-off.

Can I vote earlier than Nov. 6? In many states, yes. About early voting

Early in-person voting is offered in 37 states, and the District of Columbia, with some early voting already underway.

If you received an absentee ballot or vote-by-mail ballot, you must mail it in or drop it off at designated locations before the deadline, which varies by state. (Not all states accept ballots postmarked by Nov. 6, with some states requiring ballots be received several days prior to Election Day.)

Please make sure to follow the instructions on your absentee or vote-by-mail ballot, including signing your ballot and affixing the appropriate amount of postage.

All states offer absentee voting, although rules on eligibility and process differ by state. (How to request an absentee ballot.)

If you live outside of the United States, please visit the U.S. Vote Foundation for resources.

I don’t remember if I registered to vote. Can I register now? In some states, yes. Find registration deadlines

Every state, except North Dakota, requires voters to register.

Voter registration deadlines vary by state, with some allowing voters to register on Election Day, while others require registration weeks before Election Day.

How to register? 37 states, and the District of Columbia, allow voters to register to online at Vote.gov. In-person registration is available at certain public facilities, such as local election offices or Department of Motor Vehicle locations. The National Mail Voter Registration Form is also available in different languages, including Bengali, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.

Check your state or local election office for specific details on who can and cannot vote.

Do I need to bring ID to vote? Maybe. Two-thirds of states require some type of identification. See ID requirements

34 states require some type of ID for all voters, with specific rules varying by state.

17 states accept only photo IDs (such as driver's licenses): Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Hawaiʻi, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Another 17 states accept certain types of non-photo IDs (such as birth certificates, Social Security cards, and utility bills): Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia.

Voters who are not carrying the type of required ID to the polls may still be able to cast a provisional ballot, though additional steps may be required (for example, presenting the required ID at an election office within a specified period of time).

If you are a first-time voter, in any state, bring ID with you to the polls. Federal law requires first-time voters, who did not register in-person, to present identification at the polls.

What will be on my ballot? Decision on who will represent you in the U.S. House, and more. Find your sample ballot

In this election, everyone will be voting for who will represent them in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Additional federal, state, and local offices, and ballot initiatives will be determined by the state, county, and city each voter lives in. 35 Senate seats, 36 state and three U.S. territory governors, many city mayors, and many local measures are also on ballots.

How sample ballots are provided varies by state. If you're registered to vote, many states will mail you a sample ballot and voter information guide about 2–5 weeks before Election Day. Some states may make sample ballots available at polling locations, while others publish them in local newspapers.

Voter information guides include candidate statements and descriptions of ballot initiatives. Voters can learn more through resources such as Ballotpedia.org and the opinion section of your local newspapers.

Are there particularly close races in the U.S. House? 51 are being closely watched. Where they are

Races for seats in the U.S. House of Representatives in 15 states are being closely watched. If you live in one of these congressional districts, or know people who do, make sure you vote. (The towns and cities listed below are not a full list of areas encompassed by each district. Find out which congressional district you live in.)

** Denotes incumbent

DistrictR CandidateD CandidateMajor Cities / Towns
AZ-01Wendy RogersTom O'Halleran**PHOENIX, TUCSON
AZ-02Lea Marquez PetersonAnn KirkpatrickTUCSON, SW AZ
CA-10Jeff Denham **Josh HarderMODESTO, OAKDALE
CA-07Andrew GrantAmi Bera**ELK GROVE, RANCHO CORDOVA
CA-16Elizabeth HengJim Costa**FRESNO, MERCED, MADERA
CA-21David Valadao**Clarke TuckerBAKERSFIELD, COALINGA, HANFORD
CA-25Steve Knight**Katie HillSANTA CLARITA, PALMDALE
CA-39Young KimGil CisnerosFULLERTON, ANAHEIM HILLS
CA-45Mimi Walters**Katie PorterIRVINE, MISSION VIEJO
CA-48Dana Rohrabacher**Harley RoudaHUNTINGTON BEACH, SUNSET BEACH
CA-49Diane HarkeyMike LevinOCEANSIDE, CARLSBAD
CA-50Duncan Hunter**Ammar Campa-NajjarLAKESIDE, POWAY, RAMONA
CO-06Mike Coffman**Jason CrowAURORA, LITTLETON, HENDERSON
FL-06Nancy SoderbergMichael WalzDAYTONA BEACH, NEW SMYRNA BEACH
FL-07Mike MillerStephanie Murphy**ORLANDO, MAITLAND, WINTER PARK
FL-16Vern Buchanan**David ShapiroBRADENTON, SARASOTA
FL-18Brian Mast**Lauren BaerFT. PIERCE, PALM BEACH
FL-26Carlos Curbelo**Debbie Mucarsel-PowellSW MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, KEY WEST
FL-27Maria SalazarDonna ShalalaMIAMI, MIAMI BEACH, WEST MIAMI
ME-02Bruce Poliquin**Jared GoldenBANGOR, LEWISTON, PRESQUE ISLE
NJ-03Tom MacArthur**Andy KimBURLINGTON, MOORESTOWN, TOMS RIVER
NJ-07Leonard Lance**Tom MalinowskiRARITAN, UNION, FRANKLIN
NJ-11Jay WebberMikie SherrillWEST ORANGE, ROCKAWAY, MORRIS
NY-19John Faso**Antonio DelgadoPOUGHKEEPSIE, ONEONTA
NY-22Claudia Tenney**Anthony BrindisiUTICA, BINGHAMTON, CORTLAND
NY-24John Katko**Dana BalterSYRACUSE, OSWEGO, AUBURN
NY-27Chris Collins**Nate McMurrayGENESEO, BATAVIA, EAST AURORA
NV-03Danny TarkanianSusie LeeHENDERSON, UNINCORPORATED CLARK COUNTY
NV-04Steven HorsfordCresent HardyNORTH LAS VEGAS
PA-01Brian Fitzpatrick**Scott WallaceDOYLESTOWN, QUAKERTOWN, PERKASIE
PA-05Pearl KimMary Gay ScanlonCHESTER, MEDIA, RADNOR
PA-06Greg McCauleyChrissy HoulihanWEST CHESTER, COATESVILLE, DOWNINGTOWN
PA-07Marty NothsteinSusan WildALLENTOWN, EASTON, NAZARETH
PA-08John ChirinMatt Cartwright**SCRANTON, WILKES-BARRE, HAZLETON
PA-10Scott Perry**George ScottHARRISBURG, YORK
PA-16Mike Kelly**Ron DiNicolaERIE, GROVE CITY, EDINBORO
PA-17Keith Rothfus**Connor LambFOX CHAPEL, OAKMONT, SEWICKLEY
TX-07John Culberson**Lizzie FletcherHOUSTON, BARKER
TX-23Will Hurd**Gina JonesFORT STOCKTON, CRYSTAL CITY
TX-32Pete Sessions**Colin Allred DALLAS
UT-04Mia Love**Ben McAdamsSALT LAKE CITY, NEPHI, EAGLE MOUNTAIN
VA-02Scott Taylor**Elaine LuriaVIRGINIA BEACH, NORFOLK, HAMPTON
VA-07Dave Brat**Abigail SpanbergerCULPEPPER, GLEN ALLEN, ORANGE
VA-10Barbara Comstock**Jennifer WextonWINCHESTER, ASHBURN, CHANTILLY
WA-03Jaime Herrera Beutler**Carolyn LongLONG BEACH, ROSBURG, CENTRALIA
WA-05Cathy McMorris Rodgers**Lisa BrownSPOKANE, PULLMAN, WALLA WALLA
WA-08Dino RossiKim SchrierMAPLE VALLEY, ELLENSBURG, CHELAN
WV-03Carol Miller**Richard OjedaHUNTINGTON, BLUEFIELD, PRINCETON
WI-01Bryan SteilRandy BryceKENOSHA, RACINE
WI-06Glenn Grothman**Dan KohlFOND du LAC, MANITOWOC, OSHKOSH

The right to vote is at the heart of our democracy. Vote on Nov. 6!

On your way to the polls, don’t let your friends get left behind. Bring a friend, and head to the polls on Nov. 6!

To recap:

  1. Make sure you know your designated Nov. 6 polling place and hours. (If you are not registered, see if you still can register.)
  2. Check if you will need to bring ID, and what type of ID.
  3. Review your sample ballot.
  4. Go vote on Tuesday, Nov. 6!