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Public Lands

The Latest On: Public Lands

March 30, 2005 | Case

Strengthening Protections for Our Nation's Forests

Earthjustice challenged and won two attempts by the Bush administration that sought to severally weaken environmental regulations regarding the management of the country’s national forests, watersheds and wildlife.

January 1, 2005 | Case

Protecting Viable Wildlife Populations

Earthjustice successfully challenged the Bush administration’s efforts to gut a law that requires the Forest Service to maintain viable populations of wildlife species in national forests.

June 18, 2004 | Case

Protecting Utah’s Wild Lands

Earthjustice beat back an attempt by the Bush Bureau of Land Management and the state of Utah to open permanently open vast tracts of wilderness-quality lands in Utah to development and to strip the government of its ability to protect these pristine areas.

October 22, 2003 | Case

Protecting The Everglades From Big Agriculture

Big Sugar and Big Agriculture are destroying the Everglades. Earthjustice has been fighting back for decades, most recently with a lawsuit that aimed to get big polluters off of state owned lands in the Everglades for good.

June 17, 2003 | Case

Protecting California’s Sierra Nevada from Logging

Earthjustice challenged the revised Sierra Framework, which would triple the volume of logging on the eleven national forests in California's Sierra Nevada, while eviscerating species protections contained in the original plan.

September 23, 2002 | Press Release

Settlement Protects National Monument

BLM and conservation groups reach settlement on seismic survey of the Canyons of the Ancients National Monument.

May 12, 2002 | Feature

The Forest and the Trees

Starting after World War II, and accelerating rapidly with the administration of Ronald Reagan, the ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest were being felled at a rate that would seem to make them disappear altogether within decades. Litigation to save the northern spotted owl from extinction slowed the rate of logging dramatically in the nick of time.

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