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Landmark Victories

Since our founding in 1971 and with the generous investment of our supporters, Earthjustice has built a track record of success based on unparalleled legal and policy expertise and close collaboration with a diverse array of clients and coalition partners, from grassroots and community groups, to large national organizations.

Some of our recent court wins and legal advances:

November 1, 2002 | Case

Stopping Irresponsible Irrigation in Florida

Earthjustice sued Florida tomato growers, who were using vast amounts of water to irrigate their crops, the runoff of which was killing hardwood trees downstream.

May 12, 2002 | Feature

The Forest and the Trees

Starting after World War II, and accelerating rapidly with the administration of Ronald Reagan, the ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest were being felled at a rate that would seem to make them disappear altogether within decades. Litigation to save the northern spotted owl from extinction slowed the rate of logging dramatically in the nick of time.

October 20, 2001 | Case

Recycling A Toxic Fleet Of Ghost Ships

An Earthjustice lawsuit blocked the export of nine ex-naval ghost ships full of toxic materials. The victory ensures that these dangerous ships will be dismantled and recycled safely in the U.S., preventing a long and risky shipment across open waters.

April 26, 2001 | Feature

Homer, Louisiana: Nuclear Nonsense

Tom Turner recounts a David-and-Goliath struggle between impoverished African-American people in rural Louisiana and a mighty international consortium of government agencies and private companies bent on siting a uranium enrichment plant in their midst.

August 24, 2000 | Press Release: Victory

Victory for Family Farm Water Rights in Hawai'i

Attorneys persuade the State Water Commission to restore stream flow to the Waiahole-Waikane watershed protecting traditional Hawaiian gathering rights.

July 31, 1997 | Feature

A Snake in the Kitchen

Monica Reimer, an attorney in the Tallahassee office, writes about the only jury trial in the history of Earthjustice, an ultimately successful attempt to keep in public ownership a south Florida jewel known as Fisheating Creek.

August 19, 1996 | Feature

Gold in Them Thar Hills

It looked as if nothing could stop a Canadian mining company from reopening an abandoned gold mine adjacent to Yellowstone National Park, threatening three major watersheds with acid-laced pollution. But Earthjustice had a better idea. Staff attorney Doug Honnold explains.

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