Share this Post:

unEARTHED. The Earthjustice Blog

Feel Free to Breathe Deeply


    SIGN-UP for our latest news and action alerts:
   Please leave this field empty

Facebook Fans

Related Blog Entries

by Jessica Knoblauch:
Explosive Crude-By-Rail Rolls Into Main Street America

Is volatile crude oil coming by rail to a town near me? For weeks, I’ve been asking myself that question as I keep hearing about the skyrocketin...

by Paul Cort:
A Puzzler: How Can Weaker Air Regs Create Cleaner Air?

For as long as I have been working on air pollution issues in California, I can still be left speechless by agency decision-making—such as the r...

by Adrian Martinez:
California Cities In Fracas Over Huge Gas-Fired Power Plant

A proposal for a large—570-megawatt—gas-fired power plant is pitting two Southern California cities against each other, and has aroused ci...

Earthjustice on Twitter

View Jared Saylor's blog posts
13 March 2009, 10:11 AM
 

The New York Times reports via Greenwire that the Obama administration is making some legal maneuvers that could mean they are reconsidering health standards for smog pollution set by the Bush administration back in 2007. Earthjustice and the 60,000 of you who participated in our Adopt the Sky campaign told Bush that his approach ignored science and the law, setting a standard that fell short of what scientists recommended were safe levels to protect public health.

I know, I know, big surprise that the Bush administration let politics trump science and set a standard that did a terrible job of protecting public health and the environment, but that's why we sued them in court!

The Obama administration asked the court to "stall proceedings" on our lawsuit challenging the weak Bush standard in order to "determine whether to revise the controversial Bush-era standards," according to the Times story. Of course, we remain optimistic that the current EPA will listen to the recommendations of science and set a standard protective of public health.

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <p> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <blockquote>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.