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Cleaning Up the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers Watersheds

The Anacostia River.

The Anacostia River.

Photo courtesy of The City Project

Case Overview

Earthjustice, on behalf of the Anacostia Riverkeeper, Potomac Riverkeeper, Friends of the Earth, Waterkeeper Alliance, Pat Munoz and Mac Thornton, has filed a challenge involving a state-issued pollution discharge permit for Montgomery County’s 499-square mile stormwater system.

Clean water groups contend the permit allows ongoing harm to water quality and human health due to excessive discharges of pollutants and trash into the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers watersheds.

The Maryland Department of Environment for Montgomery County, MD itself found that, to meet the state’s own standards, Montgomery County’s stormwater discharges of sediment would need to be reduced by 46 percent, nitrogen and phosphorus by 79 percent, and fecal bacteria by 96 percent.

Case ID

1908

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Case Updates

January 9, 2013 | Legal Document

Montgomery Stormwater Standing Ruling

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals ruled earlier this week that a coalition of local and national river advocacy groups have standing to challenge a major stormwater pollution permit in court.