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Defending Minnesota Waterways From the Dangerous Line 3 Pipeline

Native women lead hundreds of marchers to a spot near where the Line 3 pipeline will cross under the Mississippi River during a protest on Jan. 9, 2021.

Native women lead hundreds of marchers to a spot near where the Line 3 pipeline will cross under the Mississippi River during a protest on Jan. 9, 2021.

Ben Hovland

What’s at Stake

The Line 3 pipeline is being built in the heart of territory where Anishinaabe retain the right to hunt, fish, and harvest wild rice under an 1855 treaty.

It would lock in decades of rising climate pollution at a time when we cannot afford any more.

Overview

Construction of the Line 3 pipeline — proposed by Canadian oil giant Enbridge to carry 790,000 barrels of tar sands oil per day — has damaged land, water, and ecosystems that are part of the Anishinaabe heritage and key to their survival. The new pipeline path would cut directly through areas with some of the highest-quality wild rice stands in Minnesota.

Earthjustice and our clients are arguing that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers broke the law by giving the pipeline a permit without evaluating how the pipeline could irrevocably damage the wetlands and waterways in northern Minnesota, including by causing an oil spill that could devastate the Tribes and their resources.

Case Updates

April 22, 2021 | In the News: The American Prospect

Will Biden Cancel Minnesota’s Line 3 Oil Pipeline?

Moneen Nasmith, Attorney, Northeast Office, Earthustice: “Enbridge likes to tout its safety record, but we have no way of really predicting when these spills will happen. The kinds of waterways and resources that this pipeline is crossing are just so important to preserve. It really is such a bad idea and such a terribly shortsighted decision to choose a few jobs for out-of-staters and profits for a corporate entity over the health and preservation of cultural resources that the tribes rely on.”