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The Environmental Legacy of Woodstock


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17 August 2009, 5:09 PM
Some Woodstock artists had a lasting impact on our environment.
Richie Havens performing at Woodstock. Photo: Derek Redman and Paul Campbell

Much is spoken about the legacy of Woodstock, the concert that defined a musical era, now celebrating a 40-year reunion. I came across this fascinating slideshow on Treehugger's website, discussing the post-Woodstock environmental activities of some of the famous rock and folk musicians that performed there. While some might be skeptical as to how great a conference Woodstock was, discovering this 40-year history of environmental stewardship that followed speaks to the historic importance of the event.

The slideshow notes some fascinating environmental pursuits of classic 60's artists. Here are some additional links and details on the musicians featured and their earth-friendly activities:

Joan Baez joined Julia Butterfly Hill in tree-sitting protests in support of community gardening.

Neil Young is a strong advocate for alternative fuels, who has not only re-invented his classic Lincoln Continental as an electric/biodiesel hybrid, but has also recorded a whole album about the subject.

The Grateful Dead joined Greenpeace in 1988 to save the rainforests. They were instrumental in founding the Slide Ranch, a teaching organic farm in Marin, County CA that introduces kids to the benefits of growing healthy foods.

Carlos Santana has incorporated solar panels into his business office and home. Like Young, he preaches what he practices, too.

Richie Havens has made teaching urban children about the environment a life's cause, first with the Northwind Undersea Institute (now closed), a museum devoted to environmental information, and more recently with the Natural Guard.

Arlo Guthrie works with fellow folk legend Pete Seeger's Hudson Sloop Clearwater, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the Hudson River. Guthrie also has a foundation that protects indigenous cultures from threats related to globalization.

Celebrating good music in healthy, open spaces is a legacy that we should leave for future rock fans. It's nice to see that many of our greatest rock legends get that.

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