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Joe Barton: Wants To Turn Out The Lights on Common Sense


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20 September 2010, 1:22 PM
Congressman to block efficiency gains and phase-out of old light bulbs
Rep. Joe Barton wants to spend his time keeping old, outdated light bulbs on store shelves

Joe Barton (R-TX) is proving that he has better things to do than apologize to Tony Hayward and BP. Now, he is trying to repeal energy efficiency standards that save American citizens billions of dollars every year. These standards, ironically, are among the few environmental policies made in eight years of Bush leadership. 

His latest daft idea is to propose legislation to wipe away huge national energy efficiency gains and block energy efficiency standards which have been on the books since 2007 and in the works well before that. These efficiency standards for light bulbs, which were reached as a part of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, had strong support from a coalition of light bulb manufacturers, electric utilities, as well as the Bush administration.

Last week Barton, the top recipient of Big Oil funds in Congress and the top recipient of special interest money from fossil fuel industries, introduced a new bill that goes against the work and support of his own party in proclaimed defense of industry in America, despite the fact that the industry itself actually supported and helped reach these standards. 

His bill, which he has named the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act, would undo these efficiency standards by striking the section of the Energy Independence and Security Act which legislates a national phase-out of the most inefficient light bulbs on the market in favor of much more efficient technology.

These standards have been on track to save American consumers $18 billion per year in utilities bills as well as save as much energy as is produced by 80 coal-fired power plants each year, but Mr. Barton seems determined to prevent those savings.

His misguided press release announcing this legislation says his aim is to save American jobs from being shipped overseas -- but these jobs were lost to China years previously when the country advanced its manufacturing of newer -- ahem -- more efficient lighting technology and surpassed American production in this market. Read Kate Sheppard's Mother Jones piece for more info on this.

Instead of promoting common-sense energy efficiency savings that put money back into the pockets of American consumers, bolster innovation and provide stability and predictability for manufacturers who favor a national standard, he'd like to fight for the right of all Americans to have old, outdated, inefficient products that cost them extra money and that are quickly becoming relics in the global market.

 

 

 

 

 

I consider repeal energy efficiency standards is not reasonable and well-considered step. Instead I suggest using more effective light bulbs, hmi bulb, for example.

It's election year and you would think that the Republicans would carefully set up ploys to show that the Obama Administration is just out of step with common sense - one example might be by overregulating the common light bulb. However, instead they have demonstrated that this type of simplistic approach brings out opposition not just from environmentalists but also lighting manufacturers too. The result illustrates a party whose ideological bent places them at odds with common sense, and shows they are unfamiliar with the details of the legislation they are trying to change. Wouldn't you have thought they would have consulted with the industry they are trying to "help" before they foray into this election year theater?

Rep Joe Barton (R-Texas), ranking minority member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and his colleagues have sent out a press release calling for the repeal of efficiency regulations in EISA (Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007) . http://republicans.energycommerce.house.gov/News/PRArticle.aspx?NewsID=8038 They have sponsored H.R. 6144, the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act (cute, the letters spell BULB).

Their press release goes into a tirade about how EISA outlaws incandescent lamps and would require everyone to use CFLs. Makes for a nice press release, unfortunately for Mr. Barton and company, this turns out not to be true - the law was structured to require higher efficiency halogen incandescents - many of which are already on the market and this law was negotiated with the lighting industry which has been investing in newer energy efficient technologies.

As a result the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) just sent out a press release http://www.nema.org/media/pr/20100921a.cfm " NEMA Reaffirms Commitment to Energy-Efficient Lighting—Better Use of Light Bulb Act is Not Better" which outlines the tremendous benefit of the EISA regulations and the mistake that the BULB Act would be.

“The reality is that consumer preference already has been shifting away from incandescent products, with the market for standard household incandescent bulbs declining by 50 percent over the last five or so years. With lighting consuming approximately 22 percent of all electricity in the U.S., the potential for energy savings and energy conservation that the country—and the world—can realize with this change to higher-technology light sources is immense. American businesses and consumers will annually save billions of dollars in electricity bills once the transition is complete,”
"EISA 2007 provisions do not mandate the use of only compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), nor do they “ban” incandescent products. "
“Energy-saving halogen (advanced incandescent) bulbs join CFLs on store shelves today, and provide the choices and desired lighting ambiance consumers want, using much less energy than consumed by the 100-year old technology they replace. More products are becoming available every day, including energy-saving, long-lasting LEDs to fill the 4.4 billion medium screw-base sockets in the U.S.,”
Rep Joe Barton's earlier claim to fame is at the Congressional hearing on the Gulf of Mexico oil spill he was apologizing to the BP CEO for a $20 Billion shakedown" in being required to contribute to fund for compensating those impacted by the oil spill. He was joined in introducing this legislation by Michael Burgess, R-Texas, ranking member of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, and Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn.

Is this who we want as the head of the House Energy and Commerce Committee if the Republicans seize control of the House this fall?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NEMA Communications
comm@nema.org

NEMA Reaffirms Commitment to Energy-Efficient Lighting—

Better Use of Light Bulb Act is Not Better

ROSSLYN, Va., September 21, 2010—The Lamp Section of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) today reaffirmed its commitment to public policies that encourage transitioning to more energy-efficient lighting, including the energy-efficient light bulb provisions of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007).

The Better Use of Light Bulb Act (HR 6144), which was recently introduced by Congressman Joe Barton (R-TX), would repeal EISA 2007 lighting provisions.

According to NEMA Vice President of Government Relations Kyle Pitsor, the lighting industry is investing heavily in new products that meet consumers' demands for efficiency and light quality while developing marketing information that will help people understand the variety of products available to them as this transition takes place.

NEMA, like Congressman Barton, understands that consumers may be anxious as the lighting industry undergoes this technology shift to higher energy-efficient products.

“The reality is that consumer preference already has been shifting away from incandescent products, with the market for standard household incandescent bulbs declining by 50 percent over the last five or so years. With lighting consuming approximately 22 percent of all electricity in the U.S., the potential for energy savings and energy conservation that the country—and the world—can realize with this change to higher-technology light sources is immense. American businesses and consumers will annually save billions of dollars in electricity bills once the transition is complete,” Pitsor said.

EISA lighting provisions set phased-in, performance-based, technology-neutral standards, starting in 2011 in California, and nationally between 2012 and 2014. The new standards will continue to provide consumers with a choice of energy-efficient lighting products to meet their needs including high-efficiency halogen (advanced technology incandescent), compact fluorescent (CFLs), and new light-emitting diode (LED) solid state products.

The first product to be affected is today’s 100-watt incandescent bulb. Beginning on January 1, 2012, manufacturers are required to produce bulbs that meet the EISA 2007 minimum efficiency requirements that result in nearly a 30 percent improvement in efficiency while providing about the same amount of light (lumens) as today’s 100-watt bulb. The new bulbs will also last longer than today’s 100-watt bulb.

Over the course of two years, similar changes will take place for 75-, 60-, and 40-watt bulbs.

EISA 2007 provisions do not mandate the use of only compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), nor do they “ban” incandescent products.

“Energy-saving halogen (advanced incandescent) bulbs join CFLs on store shelves today, and provide the choices and desired lighting ambiance consumers want, using much less energy than consumed by the 100-year old technology they replace. More products are becoming available every day, including energy-saving, long-lasting LEDs to fill the 4.4 billion medium screw-base sockets in the U.S.,” Pitsor said.

NEMA is the association of electrical and medical imaging equipment manufacturers. Founded in 1926 and headquartered near Washington, D.C., its approximately 450 member companies manufacture products used in the generation, transmission and distribution, control, and end use of electricity. These products are used in utility, industrial, commercial, institutional, and residential applications. The NEMA Lamp Section is composed of 15 manufacturers of all types of lamps (light bulbs). The association’s Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance (MITA) Division represents manufacturers of cutting-edge medical diagnostic imaging equipment including MRI, CT, x-ray, and ultrasound products. Worldwide sales of NEMA-scope products exceed $120 billion. In addition to its headquarters in Rosslyn, Virginia, NEMA also has offices in Beijing and Mexico City.

###

NEMA. Setting Standards for Excellence

Visit our website at www.nema.org

What Ms Judge fails to tell her readers is that the Energy Independence and Security Act of "2007" was passed when Democrats had complete control of BOTH the Senate AND the House. It's funny how democrats seem to leave that little piece of information out when they point to Bush for all of their blunders.

And I also want to be the first to direct everyones attention to this article,
http://www.wnd.com/?pageId=41122
Which talks about why incandescent lightbulbs (or should I say "dusty old lighbulbs") are more safe and less harmful to the environment vs Al Gore's CFL "green" lightbulbs.

This report was nothing short of opinion.

You gets FAILZ!

+1

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