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Supreme Court Reviews Air Rule that Would Prevent Thousands of Deaths Each Year


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09 December 2013, 2:13 PM
Cross-State Air Pollution Rule would yield up to $280 billion in health benefits
A regional smog layer extends across central New York, western Lake Erie and Ohio, and further west. Winds bring ozone and chemicals that participate in its formation to areas downwind of emission sources. (NASA JSC)

Today, the highest court of the land will hear argument in a case that is important to anyone with lungs.

Here’s the issue in brief: after a court of appeals invalidated the U.S. EPA’s Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR), environmental groups, the EPA itself and various states, asked the Supreme Court to get involved.

A vital air safeguard, the 2011 rule would require power plants in more than two dozen states to clean up nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide pollution that drifts across state borders and contributes to harmful soot (particles) and smog (ozone) pollution in downwind states. This cleanup would every year prevent 13,000 to 34,000 premature deaths, 15,000 non-fatal heart attacks, 19,000 hospital and emergency room visits, 19,000 episodes of acute bronchitis, 420,000 upper and lower respiratory symptoms, 400,000 episodes of aggravated asthma, and 1.8 million days of missed work or school. The EPA also projects that the rule’s pollution reductions will help protect not just people, but also the natural resources on which we depend, including national and state parks, and ecosystems including the Adirondack lakes and Appalachian streams, coastal waters and estuaries, and forests. Overall, the rule would provide up to $280 billion in health and environmental benefits.

CSAPR was adopted under the “good neighbor” provision of the Clean Air Act, and that is what the rule requires—that upwind states generating this pollution not foul the air in other states.

Earthjustice attorney Howard Fox is one of several attorneys representing Environmental Defense Fund, which filed a brief in the case in September. Briefs supporting CSAPR were also filed by the EPA and by various states and cities (New York, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, the District of Columbia, and the cities of Baltimore, Bridgeport, Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia), and by two electric utilities (Calpine Corporation and Exelon Corporation).

Earthjustice President Trip Van Noppen said:

These clean air safeguards against power plant pollution are vital public health protections that will each and every year prevent thousands of premature deaths, and hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and other illnesses.

Millions of Americans who live downwind from this deadly pollution have the right to breathe air that doesn't sicken and kill them. After years of delay, the time is long overdue for these urgently needed safeguards to be allowed to take effect.

A decision is expected from the Supreme Court by June 2014.

Unfortunately - common sense has no seat at the table in a profit dependant society. We need to make more rapid progress in opening the eys and hearts of the deniers.

The only sturctured humane approach that I have seen to be effective is really well presented physically palpable information that reaches into the hearts of shareholders and corporate board-members, through science & technology museum exhibits, and other naturally occuring 1st hand experiences.

Presentations and articles, no matter how well-written, seem only to be good for bolstering and inspiring the will to act of those who already share the awareness needed for a major shift.

Edwin

I AGREE THAT NATIONAL BORDERS HAVE AN INFLUENCE. INDONESIA HAS A BAD, BAD SITUATION IN JAKARTA WHERE THE AIR TURNS A THICK, SUPER HEAVY STEEL GREY BLUE, BECAUSE THE PUBLIC CANNOT AFFORD TO BUY CARS AND PURCHASE MOTORCYCLES INSTEAD AND THOSE TWO WHEELERS PRODUCE 200% MORE AIR POLLUTION THAN A FOUR WHEELER. GET DOWNWIND OF JARKARTA OR CAIRO OR SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA AND BE READY TO GAG.

VIRTUALLY NO NATION OR STATE CARES ABOUT ANYTHING BUT THE IMMEDIATE FUTURE..LONG TERM?

We get dirty air in the West too. Clean it up or you and your families will suffer too!

We need to take care of Mother Earth". Or She will destroy us!

Why do we put money into looking for another planet to live on. All we have to do is take care of this planet. It needs to change now!

How about across national borders? I've lived in Detroit and Windsor across the river, and Windsor was regularly hit with pollution from River Rouge plants. I wonder too about Port Huron being hit with stuff from Sarnia in Ontario.

How about across national borders? I've lived in Detroit and Windsor across the river, and Windsor was regularly hit with pollution from River Rouge plants. I wonder too about Port Huron being hit with stuff from Sarnia in Ontario.

SUPPORTING CSAPR JUST MAKES COMMON SENSE. DO IT. DO IT FOR US. DO IT FOR YOUR CHILDREN. DO IT FOR YOUR LEGACY. DO IT.

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