Skip to main content

Chlorpyrifos Damaged My Son’s Brain for Life

Claudia Angulo and her son Isaac in Orange Cove, CA.

Claudia Angulo and her son Isaac in Orange Cove, CA.

Craig Kohlruss Photography

This is a guest blog post by Claudia Angulo, a 38-year-old mother of four who lives in California’s San Joaquin Valley. This piece is also available in Spanish.

The Trump administration may like questioning solid science, but those of us who have harvested crops in the fields are well aware that the pesticide chlorpyrifos is too toxic to be used on our fruits and vegetables. I became aware of the dangers of chlorpyrifos soon after I started working in California in the mid-1990s, when I saw a plane accidentally spray pesticides onto a group of workers. Some were pregnant women and they immediately became very sick. Firefighters rushed them to the hospital, but all of the women still lost their babies.

The Trump administration may like questioning solid science, but those of us who have harvested crops in the fields are well aware that the pesticide chlorpyrifos is too toxic to be used on our fruits and vegetables.

I was 17 years old when that event occurred, and although I learned from the experience that pesticides are harmful, I didn’t understand just how terrible these toxic chemicals can be until my son, Isaac, was born with a mental disability. No one—not even the doctors—could explain why Isaac was born with mental retardation and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But I was already suspicious about pesticides, so I did my research. I quickly learned that, according to many studies, coming in contact with chlorpyrifos during pregnancy is linked to developmental problems in children, as well as autism. I'm sure this is what happened to us. I am sure that chlorpyrifos damaged my son's brain for life.

I didn’t understand just how terrible these toxic chemicals can be until my son, Isaac, was born with a mental disability.

While pregnant, I worked in food processing, sorting oranges, mandarins, lemons, apples, broccoli and other products mainly treated with chlorpyrifos. There were about nine other pregnant women on my team, and I was the last to give birth in 2006. Over the years, I’ve learned that four of those nine women also had children with ADHD. Two other babies born to women in the group had heart problems, and two more were born with respiratory problems and a skin disease called eczema.

Two years ago, I received yet more evidence of the lasting damage pesticides have done to my family. In late 2015, European journalists working on a documentary took some of Isaac's hair to test in a laboratory. According to the results, my son had traces of more than 50 pesticides in his body. The one with highest concentration was chlorpyrifos. Of all the children studied, Isaac showed the greatest exposure to pesticides because of my contact with pesticides before he was born and because he still lives and goes to school very close to farm fields. The second most impacted child was a boy from Hawai'i who had traces of 27 pesticides in his body. The root of my son’s illness is clear to me.

Claudia Angulo and her son Isaac in their home in Orange Cove, Calif.
Claudia Angulo and her son Isaac
Craig Kohlruss Photography

The pesticide test results scared me very much. I live in Orange Cove, California, surrounded by agriculture, though I no longer work in the plant or in fields that have pesticides. There are still countless sons and daughters of field workers and rural families living with as many, if not more problems than Isaac and who are still being constantly poisoned by pesticides.

Since Isaac’s diagnosis, I have worked tirelessly to raise awareness among farmworkers, the public and politicians about the effects of chlorpyrifos on the health of our communities, and especially on the families of workers who handle these chemicals on a daily basis. After diligent work, I finally thought the EPA would approve a proposal from the agency’s own scientists to ban chlorpyrifos from the market this year. Many advocates like me thought it was bound to happen, since the EPA recently said that any exposure to chlorpyrifos from food is unhealthy. But last month, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt decided not to ban chlorpyrifos after all, claiming that the science is "unresolved."

Since Isaac’s diagnosis, I have worked tirelessly to raise awareness among farmworkers, the public and politicians about the effects of chlorpyrifos on the health of our communities.

That the head of the EPA would rather put our country's health at risk than protect us from preventable illnesses makes me very angry. Chlorpyrifos was banned almost 20 years ago from household products because it was deemed too dangerous for children. So how can this toxic pesticide still be used on food crops? Ultimately, these same crops are hand-picked by farmworkers and eaten by kids.

To know that thousands of unborn babies are at risk of preventable conditions is disturbing. But hope is the last thing to die. I, for one, am committed to continuing the fight because if we as parents don’t fight to protect our children’s health, no one will. It might take more work and more time, but I'm sure we’ll get the support of the authorities and that we will soon ban chlorpyrifos from our food for good.

Take Action! Tell your representatives in Washington to support a ban on all uses of chlorpyrifos!

El Clorpirifós Dañó el Cerebro de mi Hijo de por Vida

Claudia Angulo y su hijo Isaac..
Craig Kohlruss Photography
Claudia Angulo y su hijo Isaac.

Claudia Angulo tiene 38 años, cuatro hijos y vive en el Valle de San Joaquín, California. Como invitada para el blog de EarthJustice escribió este texto en español, también disponible en inglés.

La administración Trump puede cuestionar la ciencia de los pesticidas, pero los que hemos trabajado en los campos sabemos que el pesticida clorpirifós es demasiado tóxico para utilizarlo en cualquier tipo de alimento. Me di cuenta de los peligros del clorpirifós poco después de llegar a California, a mediados de la década de 1990, cuando vi un avión accidentalmente rociar este pesticida sobre un grupo de trabajadores que incluían mujeres embarazadas. El grupo enfermó tanto y tan rápido que los bomberos tuvieron que llevarlos al hospital. Todas las mujeres embarazadas perdierons a sus bebés.

La administración Trump puede cuestionar la ciencia de los pesticidas, pero los que hemos trabajado en los campos sabemos que el pesticida clorpirifós es demasiado tóxico para utilizarlo en cualquier tipo de alimento.

Yo tenía 17 años cuando ocurrió ese evento, y aunque aprendí entonces que los pesticidas eran dañinos, no entendí lo terrible que son estos químicos hasta que mi hijo, Isaac, nació con una discapacidad mental. Nadie —ni siquiera los doctores— podía explicarme por qué mi hijo había nacido con retraso mental y trastorno por déficit de atención con hiperactividad (TDAH). Pero yo ya sospechaba de los pesticidas y comencé a investigar. Aprendí rápidamente que, según muchos estudios, entrar en contacto con clorpirifós durante el embarazo tiene relación con problemas de desarrollo en los niños, como el autismo. Estoy segura de que eso fue lo que nos pasó. Estoy segura de que el clorpirifós dañó al cerebro de mi hijo de por vida.

No entendí lo terrible que son estos químicos hasta que mi hijo, Isaac, nació con una discapacidad mental.

Cuando estaba embarazada de Isaac trabajé procesando alimentos en una planta. Ahí yo clasificaba naranjas, mandarinas, limones, manzanas, brócoli y otros productos tratados principalmente con clorpirifós. En el equipo había otras nueve mujeres embarazadas, de las cuales yo fui la última en dar a luz en 2006. Con los años supe que cuatro de estas mujeres también tuvieron niños con ADHD. Otros dos de los bebés nacieron con problemas cardíacos y otros dos con problemas respiratorios y una enfermedad de la piel llamada eczema.

Hace dos años recibí todavía más evidencia del daño que los pesticidas le han hecho a mi familia. A finales del 2015, periodistas europeos que trabajaban en un documental tomaron una muestra de pelo de Isaac para hacerle pruebas. Según los resultados, mi hijo tenía rastros de más de 50 plaguicidas en su cuerpo, y el de mayor concentración fue el clorpirifós. De todos los niños estudiados, Isaac mostró la mayor exposición a plaguicidas por mi contacto con pesticidas antes de que él naciera y porque todavía vive y va a la escuela muy cerca de campos agrícolas. El segundo niño más impactado fue uno de Hawai, que tenía 27 pesticidas en su cuerpo. Para mí la raíz de la enfermedad de mi hijo es evidente.

Claudia Angulo and her son Isaac in their home in Orange Cove, Calif.
Claudia Angulo y su hijo Isaac
Craig Kohlruss Photography

Los resultados de esa prueba me angustió mucho. Yo vivo en Orange Cove, California, rodeada de tierras agrícolas y pesticidas, o sea que aunque yo ya no trabajo en la planta ni en campos con pesticidas o sea mi familia sigue expuesta a estos tóxicos. También sé que hay incontables hijos e hijas de trabajadores y familias rurales que viven con todos los problemas de Isaac, o más, y que todavía siguen siendo envenenados por los pesticidas.

Desde el diagnóstico de Isaac he trabajado infatigablemente para sensibilizar a los trabajadores agrícolas, a los políticos y al público sobre los efectos del clorpirifós en la salud de nuestras comunidades, especialmente en las familias de trabajadores que manejan a diario estos productos químicos. Después de este arduo trabajo hace poco finalmente pensé —como muchos otros activistas— que la EPA aprobaría la propuesta de sus propios científicos que abogaron por prohibir el clorpirifós del mercado este año. Pero el mes pasado el nuevo administrador de la EPA, Scott Pruitt, decidió no prohibir el clorpirifós alegando que los estudios científicos están "sin resolver". Pruitt tomó esta decisión aunque la misma agencia admitió recientemente que cualquier exposición de alimentos al clorpirifós no es saludable.

Desde el diagnóstico de Isaac he trabajado infatigablemente para sensibilizar a los trabajadores agrícolas, a los políticos y al público sobre los efectos del clorpirifós en la salud de nuestras comunidades.

Que el jefe de la EPA prefiera poner en peligro la salud de nuestro país en vez de protegernos de enfermedades prevenibles me llena de rabia. Hace casi 20 años el clorpyrifós fue prohibido de todos los productos para el hogar porque fue considerado demasiado peligroso para los niños. ¿Cómo, entonces, se permite usar este pesticida tan tóxico en el cultivo de alimentos si sabemos que los trabajadores agrícolas trabajan con sus manos y todos los niños finalmente consumen estos productos?

Saber que miles de bebés por nacer están en riesgo de enfermedades prevenibles es preocupante. Pero la esperanza muere al último. Yo, por ejemplo, estoy comprometida a continuar esta lucha porque si nosotros como padres no luchamos para proteger la salud de nuestros hijos, nadie lo hará. Puede tomar más tiempo y más trabajo, pero estoy segura que eventualmente obtendremos el apoyo de las autoridades y que pronto prohibiremos el clorpirifós de nuestra comida.

Haga clic aquí para exigirle a sus representantes en Washington que apoyen la prohibición de todos los usos del clorpirifos!

Terms of Use

The Earthjustice blog is a forum for public discussion of issues related to Earthjustice’s work. Commenters are asked to stay on topic and avoid content that is defamatory, offensive, abusive or intended to promote commercial interests. Because Earthjustice does not support or endorse candidates for any elective office, comments should refrain from endorsing or opposing candidates for office and political parties, either explicitly or by implication. We reserve the right to remove any comment that violates these terms.