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Petitioning EPA on Civil Rights Violations

An industrial hog facility in North Carolina.

An industrial hog facility in North Carolina. Hog feces and urine are flushed into open, unlined pits and then sprayed onto nearby fields. The practice leads to waste contaminating nearby waters, and drifting as "mist" onto neighboring properties.

Photo courtesy of Friends of Family Farmers

What's at Stake

The industrial hog facilities are disproportionately located in communities of color, where residents are forced to endure the smell and water quality impacts.

Case Overview

The North Carolina Environmental Justice Network, Rural Empowerment Association for Community Help and Waterkeeper Alliance, supported by Earthjustice, have filed a complaint with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Civil Rights under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 alleging that North Carolina’s lax regulation of hog waste disposal discriminates against communities of color in eastern North Carolina.

The complaint is the latest chapter in a longstanding struggle to address the community health impacts posed by massive amounts of fecal waste from industrial hog facilities. Community members have repeatedly asked the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) for stronger protections, but are now seeking help from the EPA, stating that a recent decision by DENR to issue a permit that will cover thousands of hog facilities without adequate waste disposal controls violates federal law and civil rights.

The permit continues to allow industry to flush hog feces and urine into open, unlined pits and then to spray this “liquid manure” onto nearby fields. This practice leads to waste contaminating nearby waters. The waste also drifts as mist onto neighboring properties, causing unbearable odors. The impact is worsened by the growth of the poultry industry in the state and the piles of chicken waste that often sit uncovered on fields for days on end.

These operations are disproportionately located in communities of color where neighbors are forced to endure the smell, water quality impacts and the embarrassment associated with the facilities operating near their homes.

Case ID

2382

Case Updates

March 8, 2016 | Feature

What You Need To Know About Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed discrimination on the basis of color, religion, national origin and gender. The text of the law is thematically organized into eleven sections, Title I to Title XI. Title VI is of particular significance. Find out why.

March 8, 2016 | Feature

Título VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964

La Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964 prohibió la discriminación en base a color, religión, origen nacional y género. El texto de la ley está organizado por temas en once secciones, desde el Título I al Título XI. El Título VI es de particular importancia.

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October 30, 2015 | Feature

Righting Civil Wrongs

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is one of the few enforceable civil rights laws that cover environmental actions. And from California to Michigan, low-income communities of color have been waiting years for the EPA to take a stand against environmental racism.

October 30, 2015 | Feature

Corrigiendo Las Injusticias Civiles Del Pasado

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