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Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

The Latest On: Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives

May 3, 2013 | Feature

50 States United Partners

Earthjustice worked with a coalition of allies on the 50 States United for Healthy Air event. Learn more about our partners.

May 2, 2013 | Blog Post

Tr-Ash Talk: Danger in the Schoolyard

Recent sampling of paths constructed of coal ash near J.L. Wilkinson Elementary School in Middleburg, Florida reveal high levels of vanadium, a hazardous substance linked to cardiovascular disease and nervous system damage. Vanadium levels were up to seven times higher than levels deemed safe for residential soil by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

April 25, 2013 | Case

Protecting Waterways from TVA's Gallatin Coal Plant

The Tennessee Valley Authority’s Gallatin coal plant is dumping toxic wastewater into unlined ponds, which is harming the local environment. Additionally, the plant’s cooling apparatus routinely kills tens of thousands of fish and other aquatic life that get trapped in the machinery every year. Earthjustice is working to stop Gallatin’s pollution and force it to update its outdated cooling system.

March 19, 2013 | Blog Post

Senate Showdown Over Health, Environment

Arsenic-infused drinking water, the risk of cancer, and the fear of being washed away by a flood of toxic sludge are a burden of concern for Americans living near more than 1,300 toxic coal ash dump sites.They have expressed their concerns through numerous letters to Congress, petitions, and more than 450,000 public comments to the Environmental Protect

March 8, 2013 | Blog Post

Michigan State U Must Be Greener Than Spartan Deep

My favorite aunt became a dean at Michigan State back in the early 1980’s. She was a role model for us all, assuming a level of power and influence that most women—especially African American women—had not been able access at that time. She, like many other students and faculty at the time, enjoyed the campus and resources it provided. But what she didn’t know was that the water that she drank, bathed in and used for cooking and cleaning and cleaning, may have been poisoned by toxic coal ash.

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