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Coal Ash: Reports & Publications

Reports and analysis from Earthjustice and our partners document the growing public health threat from coal ash, the hazardous waste that remains after coal is burned.

Don’t Drink the Water: Groundwater Contamination and the "Beneficial Reuse" of Coal Ash in Southeast Wisconsin

Don’t Drink the Water: Groundwater Contamination and the

November 2014Clean Wisconsin’s new report, Don’t Drink the Water, demonstrates that coal ash reuse may pose significant public health threats. The report highlights the risks to residents of southeast Wisconsin, where more than one million tons of toxic coal ash has been used in building projects near drinking water wells. The report documents how dangerous chemicals have made their way into the drinking water of hundreds of Wisconsin citizens.

Though it focuses on Wisconsin, the report highlights a national problem. Use of coal ash as construction fill has caused water contamination at sites across the nation. Each year, more than 20 million tons of coal ash are placed as fill without adequate safeguards to prevent hazardous chemicals from entering our water.

Ash in Lungs: How Breathing Coal Ash is Hazardous to Your Health

Ash in Lungs: How Breathing Coal Ash is Hazardous to Your Health

July 2014 – Released by Physicians for Social Responsibility and Earthjustice, the report, Ash in Lungs, describes the harmful effects of simply breathing near coal ash disposal sites.

Silica exposure via coal ash (which can lead to silicosis, a scarring of the lung tissue), exposure to radioactive materials present in coal ash dust and exposure to mercury and hydrogen sulfide are all possible when breathing coal ash dust.

Dust from coal ash landfills and uncovered trucks carrying coal ash blows into nearby communities, putting lives at risk. Workers at power plants and coal ash dumpsites are also exposed to these dangerous pollutants. The report highlights six communities poisoned by coal ash dust.

Closing the Floodgates: How The Coal Industry Is Poisoning Our Water And How We Can Stop It

Closing the Floodgates: How The Coal Industry Is Poisoning Our Water And How We Can Stop It

July 2013 – Coal-fired power plants are the largest source of toxic water pollution in the United States based on toxicity, dumping billions of pounds of pollution into America’s rivers, lakes, and streams each year.

The waste from coal plants, also known as coal combustion waste, includes coal ash and sludge from pollution controls called “scrubbers” that are notorious for contaminating ground and surface waters with toxic heavy metals and other pollutants.

These pollutants, including lead and mercury, can be dangerous to humans and wreak havoc in our watersheds even in very small amounts. The toxic metals in this waste do not degrade over time and many bio-accumulate, increasing in concentration as they travel up the food chain, ultimately collecting in our bodies, and the bodies of our children.

State of Failure: How States Fail To Protect Our Health And Drinking Water From Toxic Coal Ash

State of Failure: How States Fail To Protect Our Health And Drinking Water From Toxic Coal Ash

August 2011State of Failure, released by Earthjustice and Appalachian Mountain Advocates, is an exhaustive review of state regulations in 37 states, which together comprise over 98 percent of all coal ash generated nationally.

This study highlights the lack of state-based regulations for coal ash disposal and points to the 12 worst states when it comes to coal ash dumping: Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, South Carolina and Virginia.

EPA's Blind Spot: Hexavalent Chromium in Coal Ash

EPA's Blind Spot: Hexavalent Chromium in Coal Ash

February 2011 – A report by Earthjustice, Physicians for Social Responsibility and Environmental Integrity Project, EPA's Blind Spot shows that scores of leaking coal ash sites across the country are documented sites for hexavalent chromium contamination in groundwater.

Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic carcinogen when inhaled, and recent studies from the National Toxicology Program indicate that when leaked into drinking water, it also can cause cancer.

Re-evaluation of Estimates in U.S. EPA Regulatory Impact Analysis

December 2010 – According to this review conducted by the Environmental Integrity Project, Earthjustice, and the Stockholm Environment Institute's U.S. Center (based at Tufts University), the EPA's claim that coal ash recycling is worth more than $23 billion a year is more than 20 times higher than the $1.15 billion that the U.S. government's own data shows is the correct bottom-line number.

Coal Ash: The Toxic Threat to Our Health and Environment

Coal Ash: The Toxic Threat to Our Health and Environment

September 2010 – Water and air in 34 states are being poisoned by the waste of coal-fired power plants—creating major health risks for children and adults—according to the report, Coal Ash: The Toxic Threat, released by Earthjustice and Physicians for Social Responsibility.

The ground-breaking study connects the contamination occurring at hundreds of coal ash dumps and waste ponds across the country to health threats such as cancer, nerve damage and impairment of a child's ability to write, read and learn.

In Harm's Way: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans and their Environment

In Harm's Way: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans and their Environment

August 2010In Harm's Way identified additional coal ash dump sites in 21 states that are contaminating drinking water or surface water with arsenic and other heavy metals.

The report by the Environmental Integrity Project, Earthjustice and the Sierra Club documents the fact that state governments are not adequately monitoring the coal combustion waste disposal sites and that the EPA needs to enact strong new regulations to protect the public.

Failing the Test: Unintended Consequences of Controlling HAPs from Coal Plants

May 2010 – In December 2009, the EPA produced a report examining the fate of pollution captured in smokestacks at coal-fired power pants. The report was quietly posted to the EPA's website, but offered groundbreaking results.

The new testing method by the EPA's Office of Research and Development revealed that pollutants such as arsenic, antimony, chromium and selenium, can leach from coal ash at levels dozens and sometimes hundreds of times greater than the federal drinking water standard. Failing the Test summarizes the EPA's findings.

Out of Control: Mounting Damages from Coal Ash Waste Sites

Out of Control: Mounting Damages from Coal Ash Waste Sites

February 2010 – This major report by Earthjustice and the Environmental Integrity Project identified 31 additional coal ash contamination sites in 14 states, with data showing arsenic and other toxic metal levels in contaminated water at some coal ash disposal sites at up to 145 times federally permissible levels.

Waste Deep: Filling Mines with Ash is Profit for Industry, But Poison for People

>Waste Deep: Filling Mines with Ash is Profit for Industry, But Poison for People

January 2009 – Released in the wake of coal ash disasters at two Tennessee Valley Authority power plants, Waste Deep documents the unseen threat posed by toxic coal ash dumped in active and abandoned coal mines.

The report casts a spotlight on minefilling, the practice of dumping coal ash into active and abandoned coal mines. This unregulated disposal method has poisoned streams and drinking water supplies across the country with arsenic, lead, chromium, selenium, and other toxins.

Coming Clean: Filling Mines with Ash is Profit for Industry, But Poison for People

Coming Clean: Filling Mines with Ash is Profit for Industry, But Poison for People

January 2009 –New analysis of data by the EPA shows that those who live near coal ash dumps face elevated cancer risks.

This report, by the Environmental Integrity Project and Earthjustice, analyzes the EPA data—buried for years by the Bush administration—finding that residents who live near coal ash waste ponds have as much as a 1 in 50 chance of getting cancer from drinking water contaminated by arsenic, one of the most common, and most dangerous, pollutants from coal ash.

Spotlight Features

The Coal Ash Problem

Coal ash is filled with toxic levels of multiple pollutants—which can poison drinking water sources. No federal regulations for this waste currently exist. See the infographic, and learn how you can help to solve the coal ash problem.

Little Blue: A Broken Promise

A small community was promised a recreational dream. Instead, they got a toxic nightmare. In this video, watch their battle against coal ash, a toxic waste that is polluting hundreds of similar communities across America.

180 Seconds of Coal Ash Problems

Coal ash is the hazardous waste that remains after coal is burned. Dumped into unlined ponds or mines, the toxins from coal ash readily leach into drinking water supplies.