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Wyoming Wolf Plan Intervention

Case Overview

Wyoming's wolves are protected by the federal government. The state wants to take over management and allow the killing of wolves. The Fish and Wildlife Service denied Wyoming's plan; ranchers, farmers, and others filed suit; and Earthjustice intevened to assure a stout defense of the wolves.

Case ID

9428

Attorneys

Case Updates

November 26, 2012 | In the News: KHOU 11 News Houston

Suit Filed Against Wyoming’s Kill‐at‐Will Wolf Policy

A federal decision allowing Wyoming to remove its grey wolves from the Endangered Species List is being challenged in court by several conservation groups. The groups filed suit with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, asking to reinstate protections for the wolves and stop the policy under which at least 49 wolves have been killed since Wyoming took over the population management in October.

September 24, 2012 | In the News: Cody Enterprise

Pending suits won’t stop Wyoming wolf season

One outside expert says Wyoming’s wolf management plan has some flaws that might not stand up in court against the legal challenge brought on by environmental groups. Wyoming’s Game and Fish Department classifies wolves as predators who can be shot on sight with no season or bag limit.

“We don’t think a shoot-on-sight policy is appropriate for wolves, and it’s not sound wildlife management,” said managing attorney Tim Preso of Earthjustice in Bozeman.

September 19, 2012 | In the News: Bozeman Daily Chronicle

Groups intend to sue over Wyoming wolf delisting

On behalf of a coalition of environmental groups, Earthjustice has notified the federal government that it will challenge its decision to hand over the wolf management plan to the state of Wyoming. Wyoming’s “shoot on sight” policy treats wolves as predators that can be killed at any time in most of the state.

September 14, 2012 | Blog Post

Taking Wyoming Wolf Hunting To Court

The tragic delisting of Wyoming’s gray wolves from the Endangered Species List has many wildlife defenders up in arms, and with sound reason: the removal of protections for the wolves marks an end to many years of successful recovery efforts of a species that was once on the verge of extinction.