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How Earthjustice stopped Hawai‘i’s deadly aquarium pet trade.
(Ceylan Sahin Eker for Earthjustice)
feature April 20, 2022

Hawai‘i’s Aquarium Pet Trade Was a Deadly Business.

How Earthjustice stopped Hawai‘i’s deadly aquarium pet trade.

Yellow tangs, called Lau’ipala by Native Hawaiians, are the most exploited Hawaiian aquarium fish. The industry has historically extracted approximately 300,000 individuals from local reefs per year and exported them.
(Kaikea Nakachi)
Press Release October 9, 2021

Hawai‘i Land Board Rejects Aquarium Pet Trade Yet Again

Impact statement for O‘ahu falls short of state law requirements, Board says

Document July 13, 2021

Coalition Sues Hawai‘i Land Board to Halt Reopening of Aquarium Pet Trade

Coalition Sues Hawai‘i Land Board to Halt Reopening of Aquarium Pet Trade

Yellow tangs, called Lau’ipala by Native Hawaiians, are the most exploited Hawaiian aquarium fish. The industry has historically extracted approximately 300,000 individuals from local reefs per year and exported them.
(Kaikea Nakachi)
Press Release July 13, 2021

Coalition Sues Hawai‘i Land Board to Halt Reopening of Aquarium Pet Trade

The Hawai‘i Land Board's failure to reject impact statement violated state law

Yellow tangs, called Lau’ipala in Hawaiian, are the most exploited Hawaiian aquarium fish. The industry historically extracts and exports around 300,000 individuals per year.
(Kaikea Nakachi)
Press Release June 25, 2021

Hawai‘i Land Board Deadlocked on Aquarium Pet Trade

New impact statement to be accepted on legal technicality

An aquarium collector takes fish from a reef in Hawai`i.
(Photo provided by Brooke Everett)
case January 12, 2021

Protecting Hawai’i’s Reef from the Aquarium Trade

Aquarium collectors capture hundreds of thousands of fish and invertebrates from Hawaiʻi’s reefs every year. Alarmingly, the Hawaiʻi’s Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) has stated that this should be considered a minimum estimate because it does not verify the accuracy of submitted catch reports. The collected animals are primarily herbivorous, reef-dwellers that serve…

Press Release: Victory January 12, 2021

Hawai‘i Court Confirms Illegal Aquarium Collection Must Stop

Latest attempt by state to sidestep the court and allow continued collection shut down

An aquarium collector takes fish from a reef in Hawai`i.
(Photo courtesy of Brooke Everett)
Article: Victory December 22, 2020

Hawaiʻi Scores Another Big Win in Stopping Harmful Aquarium Fishing, Protecting Reefs and Native Hawaiians

Court closes loophole that allowed industry to illegally extract over half a million marine animals from Hawai‘i reefs in the last two years.

Document November 30, 2020

Aquarium Collection Minute Order

Department of Land and Natural Resources violated the law by allowing the aquarium trade to continue extracting hundreds of thousands of marine animals from Hawaiʻi’s reefs without first reviewing the environmental and cultural impacts.

Press Release: Victory November 29, 2020

Hawai‘i Court Rules Commercial Aquarium Collection Without Environmental Review Illegal

Court closes loophole that allowed industry to illegally extract over half a million marine animals from Hawai‘i reefs since 2017

Yellow tangs, known as Lau’ipala by Native Hawaiians, are the most exploited Hawaiian aquarium fish. The industry historically has extracted roughly 300,000 individuals per year.
(Kaikea Nakachi)
Press Release: Victory August 14, 2020

Environmental Council Unanimously Affirms Rejection of Aquarium Trade Environmental Impact Statement

Ban on collecting west Hawai‘i reef fish for aquarium trade effectively extended

Document August 13, 2020

Decision: State of Hawaii, Docket No. DOH-EC-20-001

The Environmental Council's Findings Of Fact, Conclusions Of Law, And Decision And Order

Yellow tangs, known as Lau’ipala by Native Hawaiians, are the most exploited Hawaiian aquarium fish. The industry historically has extracted roughly 300,000 individuals per year.
(Kaikea Nakachi)
Press Release: Victory May 26, 2020

Hawai‘i Land Board Says No to Aquarium Pet Trade

Milestone decision protects West Hawai‘i reefs, rebukes industry

Document January 27, 2020

Complaint for Declaratory and Injunctive Relief of DLNR, State of Hawai‘i

Complaint of DLNR, State of Hawai‘i. Despite courts directives to halt commercial aquarium collection until the environmental review process has been completed, DLNR has allowed such collection to continue unlawfully under commercial marine licenses (CMLs) and has issued or renewed CMLs to commercial aquarium collectors.

Aquarium collectors taking fish from a reef in Hawai‘i.
(Photo courtesy of Paul Cox)
Press Release January 27, 2020

Native Hawaiians and Conservationists Sue Hawai‘i Agency for Rampant Aquarium Collection Harming Hawai‘i’s Reefs

After a 2017 Hawai‘i Supreme Court decision requiring environmental review of aquarium collection, state agency created loopholes for industry

Document January 7, 2020

Ongoing Illegal Aquarium Collection Under Commercial Marine Licenses and Request for Meeting

Earthjustice, For the Fishes, Willie and Ka‘imi Kaupiko, Mike Nakachi, and Center for Biological Diversity raise the Hawaiʻi State Department of Land and Natural Resources’ ongoing unlawful practice of allowing commercial aquarium collection to continue without compliance with the environmental review requirements under the Hawai‘i Environmental Policy Act, Haw. Rev. Stat. (HRS) ch. 343.

Aquarium collectors taking fish from a reef in Hawai‘i.
(Photo courtesy of Paul Cox)
Press Release January 7, 2020

Conservationists Challenge State Agency on Rampant, Unregulated Aquarium Collection Harming Hawai‘i’s Reefs

After a 2017 Hawai`i Supreme Court decision requiring environmental review to issue aquarium collection permits, state agency decided permits weren’t necessary anymore

An aquarium collector takes fish from a reef in Hawai`i.
(Photo provided by Brooke Everett)
Press Release: Victory April 16, 2018

Hawai‘i Court Voids All Existing Recreational Aquarium Collection Permits

State illegally permitted capture of 250,000 fish in a year