Library Search

Clean water advocates attend a Protect Our Waters rally outside the Supreme Court the same day as arguments in Sackett v. EPA in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 3, 2022. (Melissa Lyttle for Earthjustice)
Article May 22, 2024

When the Supreme Court Gutted Clean Water Protections, Local Champions Stepped Up

A year after Sackett v. EPA, here’s how advocates are fighting state by state to restore safeguards against pollution and habitat destruction.

In the News: Rhode Island Current March 21, 2024

As feds stand down, states choose between wetlands protections or rollbacks

Julian Gonzalez, Senior Legislative Counsel, Policy & Legislation: “It’s unfortunate that the state legislature tried to lock in the damage done by Sackett, but there are still things that can be done in places where a governor is more interested in environmental protection than polluter profits.”

In the News: The Denver Post January 28, 2024

After the Supreme Court gutted federal protections for half of Colorado’s waters, can state leaders fill the gap?

Stu Gillespie, Attorney, Rocky Mountain Office: “Clean water is one of those things we take for granted, and you don’t really notice until you don’t have it.”

(Ren Photo / Getty Images)
Press Release October 19, 2023

Clean Water Act Bill is Big Step Forward, Needs to Eliminate Loophole to Truly Restore Protections

Earthjustice and its clients urge Congress to act swiftly

United States Supreme Court (front row L-R) Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, Associate Justice Samuel Alito, and Associate Justice Elena Kagan, (back row L-R) Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh and Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson pose for their official portrait at the East Conference Room of the Supreme Court building on October 7, 2022 in Washington, DC. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)
From the Experts September 26, 2023

Here’s What to Expect From the Supreme Court This Term

Recent environmental rulings from the Supreme Court’s conservative supermajority have revealed a dangerous agenda, but we still have strong legal tools to protect people and the planet.

Canoeing the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Northern Minnesota. (Brad Zweerink / Earthjustice)
Press Release August 29, 2023

SCOTUS Ruling Spurs EPA to Reduce Protection for U.S. Waterways

More than half the country’s wetlands, along with streams and even lakes, could be left vulnerable to pollution

document August 22, 2023

Updated WOTUS Rule (Aug 2023)

Updated Waters of the United States Rule (WOTUS), released by the Environmental Protection Agency in response to the Supreme Court decision in Sackett v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

In the News: Strict Scrutiny May 29, 2023

A Wrecking Ball to Environmental Law

Sam Sankar, Senior VP of Programs at Earthjustice, explains the Supreme Court’s opinion in Sackett v. EPA. Millions of acres of wetlands risk losing federal environmental protections, threatening the future of the nation’s clean water.

The wetlands affected by Sackett include those that supply the drinking water for millions of people in the United States. (Getty Images)
Article May 26, 2023

What Does Sackett v. EPA Mean for Clean Water?

A lawyer analyzes the Supreme Court’s ruling.

A few hundred supporters of clean water rallied outside the Supreme Court on Oct. 3, 2022, as the court heard oral arguments in Sackett v. EPA.
(Melissa Lyttle for Earthjustice)
Update May 25, 2023

Supreme Court Catastrophically Undermines Clean Water Protections

Sackett v. EPA threatens more than half of the 118 million acres of wetlands in the United States. Here’s what we can do now to fight for clean water.

Pelicans flying home to roost over salt marsh at Hunting Island State Park in South Carolina near Beaufort. (Teresa Kopec / Getty Images)
Press Release May 25, 2023

Supreme Court Weakens Clean Water Act Protections

Generations will face repercussions of Court’s decision to eliminate protections for more than half of 118 million acres of wetlands

Pelicans flying home to roost over salt marsh at Hunting Island State Park in South Carolina near Beaufort. (Teresa Kopec / Getty Images)
Update April 18, 2023

New Ruling Weakens Protections for Waterways in Nearly Half of Nation’s States

A North Dakota judge blocked the Biden administration’s “Waters of the United States” rule in 24 states, putting our nation’s clean wetlands, rivers, streams, and drinking water jeopardy.

A marsh at sunset in Beaufort, South Carolina. (Teresa Kopec / Getty Images)
Press Release April 12, 2023

ND Judge Blocks Current Clean Water Protections in 24 States

Judge adopts unsupported claim by states intent on dismantling the Clean Water Act

document April 12, 2023

WOTUS Preliminary Injunction

A federal district court in North Dakota stayed the Environmental Protection Agency’s science-based rule revising the definition of “Waters of the United States.” The ruling halts current clean water safeguards and potentially strips protections from many types of wetlands, streams, and interstate waters in 24 states.

document March 19, 2023

WOTUS injunction decision in Texas/Idaho

WOTUS injunction decision in Texas/Idaho

Press Release December 30, 2022

EPA Finalizes Rule Protecting ‘Waters of the United States’

Supreme Court overreach may weaken EPA’s science-based rule

People braved the cold and rain for a "Protect Our Waters" rally at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 3, 2022, as oral arguments were heard in Sackett v. EPA. The rally called on the Justices to safeguard our nation’s waterways.
(Melissa Lyttle for Earthjustice)
Press Release October 3, 2022

The Supreme Court Will Decide the Future of Clean Water for Generations

Polluters' legal challenge aims to maximize profits at the expense of the health of communities and our environment

case June 30, 2022

Waters of the United States

In 2021, the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona said Trump’s Navigable Waters Protection Rule must be vacated because the rule contains serious errors and has the potential to cause significant harm to the nation’s waters if left in place while the Biden administration works on revisions to the rule. The court ruling…