Library Search

Ciarra Greene, member of the Nez Perce Tribe, walks along a section of the Snake River near Asotin, Wash. (Brian Plonka for Earthjustice)
Update June 27, 2024

The Federal Government Is Finally Acknowledging How Columbia River Basin Dams Have Harmed Tribes

A new report highlights the need for concrete action to restore salmon populations and honor treaty obligations.

Members of the Nez Perce Tribe host a stop on the “Red Road to D.C.” tour at the Snake River in Idaho on Jul. 15, 2021. Members of the Lummi Nation transported a 25-foot totem pole from Washington State to Washington, D.C., stopping at multiple sacred places under threat from resource extraction and industrial development. (Wingspan Media & Te Maia Wiki)
Press Release June 18, 2024

Federal Report Underscores Need to Protect Columbia Basin Salmon for Tribal Justice

Tribal Circumstances Analysis acknowledges historic, ongoing and cumulative injustice to Tribes from the Columbia Basin dams and need for immediate action

A wild chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)
Press Release June 13, 2024

Quinault Nation Calls for Dam Removal on Skookumchuck River to Save Salmon

Fish blocking dam’s purpose will end with closure of the Centralia Coal Plant in 2025

Yurok guides paddle tourists along the Klamath River in traditional canoes hand crafted from Redwood trees. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Article June 3, 2024

Klamath River Dam Removal Is a Victory for Tribes

After a century of ecological collapse, steelhead and salmon in the Klamath River now have a fighting chance at a full recovery.

Sockeye salmon race through the Alagnak River in Alaska's Bristol Bay watershed.
(Photo courtesy of Fish Eye Guy Photography)
feature May 17, 2024

Alaska’s Bristol Bay & The Pebble Mine

An open-pit mine threatened one of the last places on Earth where wild salmon still thrive. We will protect Bristol Bay, one of our world's surviving great ecosystems.

Sockeye salmon in Little Redfish Lake Creek, a tributary of the Snake River. (Neil Ever Osborne / Save Our Wild Salmon)
feature December 14, 2023

Timeline: A Long Fight to Restore Snake River Salmon

Learn about the major events, court rulings, and where we are now in this long-standing fight.

The U.S. Supreme Court. (Shutterstock)
Press Release July 11, 2024

Earthjustice Supports New Legislation to Safeguard Federal Protections and Reverse Damaging Corner Post Supreme Court Decision

Recent Supreme Court decision exposes federal protections to tidal wave of industry litigation attacking long-standing public protections

An endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle. The orca is from the J pod, one of three groups of southern resident killer whales that frequent the inland waters of Washington state.  (Elaine Thompson / AP)
Article December 14, 2023

Northwest Tribes Demand Action for Salmon and Orca Restoration

Tribes call for dam removal and restoration of healthy salmon and orca populations during emotional two-day summit.

A fishing crew member carries a salmon to the hold of boat in Washington State. (Thomas Barwick / Getty images)
Press Release February 22, 2024

Swinomish Tribal Community Demands EPA Act to Stop Harm to Lower Skagit River Salmon From Temperature Pollution

Ongoing violations of temperature standards for 20 years harm ESA-listed salmon populations; Tribe provides notice to sue EPA

feature April 2, 2024

This Treasured Alaska Rainforest Shields Us From Climate Change

The National Roadless Rule, now reinstated on the Tongass National Forest, safeguards vast tracts of old-growth forest that serve as important carbon sinks.

Earthjustice President Abbie Dillen (center) joined Earthjustice staff and clients for a White House signing of the historic Columbia River Basin agreement.
From the Experts April 12, 2024

Charting a Path Forward to Recover Salmon in the Columbia River Basin

A ceremonial signing at the White House in February honored decades of hard work and solidified partnerships to recover salmon while pointing to significant work that lays ahead.

Snake River's blue waters stand out against green landscape with Teton Mountain Range ascending in the background. Grand Tetons National Park, Teton County, Wyoming. (Edwin Remsberg / Getty Images)
Update December 7, 2023

Snake River Salmon Are in Crisis — But a Turning Point May Be Near

As time runs out for Pacific Northwest salmon, the Biden administration is signaling important steps to restore native fish populations and honor treaty obligations.

The Puyallup River, with Mount Tahoma (Rainier) in the background. (David Seibold / CC BY-NC 2.0)
Update February 22, 2024

In a Win for Endangered Salmon, Court Orders Puyallup River Dam Removal

Electron Dam has been harming Chinook salmon, steelhead, and trout for nearly 100 years. With part of the dam gone, the river will flow naturally for the first time in almost a century.

Sockeye salmon race through the Alagnak River in Alaska's Bristol Bay watershed.
(Photo courtesy of Fish Eye Guy Photography)
Update May 20, 2024

Earthjustice Returns to Court to Protect Huge Win Against Proposed Pebble Mine

The proposed mine would destroy nearly 100 miles of fish stream habitat and 2,100 acres of wetlands, lakes, and ponds.

The Bristol Bay area of Alaska, where the proposed Pebble Mine threatens both one of the largest salmon spawning grounds in the world and the way of life for an entire area. (Pat Clayton / Fish Eye Guy Photography)
Press Release May 17, 2024

Conservation Groups Defend the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Decision on the Proposed Pebble Mine

Earthjustice and NRDC join with Trustees for Alaska on behalf of 15 groups to defend Bristol Bay from the proposed Pebble Mine

An adult salmon navigates through the fish ladder counting room at the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River. (Brian Plonka for Earthjustice)
Press Release December 14, 2023

U.S. Government Sets a Path to Breach the Four Lower Snake River Dams

The Biden administration commits considerable federal resources to support the restoration of native fish populations and prepare for dam breaching

Sockeye salmon make their way back up a river in the Pacific Northwest to spawn. (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Photo)
Update November 8, 2023

We’re Going to Court to Protect Salmon from a Highly Toxic Chemical

U.S. fishing groups are suing tire manufactures over 6PPD, a chemical in tires, which interacts with ground-level ozone to create the highly toxic 6PPD-q.

Lower Granite Dam, one of the four massive dams on the Lower Snake River, that is driving wild salmon to extinction. The other three are Ice Harbor, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental.
(Chris Jordan-Bloch / Earthjustice)
feature January 8, 2023

Why Restoration of the Lower Snake River is Necessary to Save Wild Salmon

It’s time for the four dams on the Lower Snake River to go and for our salmon to come home — to a free-flowing and healthy Snake River.