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May 24, 2010 | Video

Flyover of Seattle, WA Cement Kilns

Two cement kilns, located just outside of downtown Seattle, WA, are significant sources of mercury pollution in the area. Mercury emissions from these sites impact hundreds of thousands of people around the Puget Sound area. Toxic levels of mercury in fish affect everyone, especially children and pregnant women.

May 24, 2010 | Video

Flyover of Cupertino, CA Cement Kiln

This video features the Cupertino cement kiln, located just outside San Francisco, CA. Mercury emissions from this site impact hundreds of thousands of people in the Bay Area. Toxic levels of mercury in fish affect everyone, especially children and pregnant women.

April 20, 2010 | Video

Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives: New Mexico Interview

Coal-fired power plants are poisoning our rivers, lakes and streams with coal ash, a waste product that contains arsenic, mercury, and lead. Coal ash poisons fish, making them unsafe to eat. For decades, power plants have carelessly dumped coal ash into ponds and landfills that leak into our rivers and streams. It's time for the EPA to set strong safeguards that classify coal ash as hazardous waste—because that's exactly what it is.

April 20, 2010 | Video

Coal Ash Contaminates Our Lives: Tennessee Interview

Coal-fired power plants are poisoning our rivers, lakes and streams with coal ash, a waste product that contains arsenic, mercury, and lead. Coal ash poisons fish, making them unsafe to eat. For decades, power plants have carelessly dumped coal ash into ponds and landfills that leak into our rivers and streams. It's time for the EPA to set strong safeguards that classify coal ash as hazardous waste—because that's exactly what it is.

April 19, 2010 | Video

Coal Ash Contaminates Our Livelihood

Coal-fired power plants are poisoning our rivers, lakes and streams with coal ash, a waste product that contains arsenic, mercury, and lead. Coal ash poisons fish, making them unsafe to eat. For decades, power plants have carelessly dumped coal ash into ponds and landfills that leak into our rivers and streams. It's time for the EPA to set strong safeguards that classify coal ash as hazardous waste—because that's exactly what it is.

February 18, 2010 | Video

Pesticides in the Air, Kids at Risk

Each year, nearly one billion pounds of pesticides are sprayed into fields and orchards around the country. As the families who live nearby can tell you, those pesticides don't always stay in the fields and orchards.

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