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Climate Change

The Latest On: Climate Change

September 15, 2011 | Audio

On the 2011 Arctic Ice Melt

On September 15, 2011, Arctic sea ice shrank to its second-smallest extent in decades of monitoring, second only to the record-setting melt that alarmed scientists around the world in 2007.
The melting of Arctic sea ice is a powerful indicator of the rapid warming occurring throughout the Arctic. This warming has also increased melting of continental glaciers and the Greenland Ice Sheet, which led scientists earlier this year to project a sea level rise of 0.9 to 1.6 meters (or as much as 5 feet) by the end of this century.
Warming in the Arctic also affects weather in the United States and other countries at mid-latitudes and is thought to be responsible for more severe storms.
This recording presents three leading scientists, introduced by NGO [non-governmental organization] policy experts.

September 15, 2011 | Audio

Telepress ice-melt 2011-09-15 p1

On September 15, 2011, Arctic sea ice shrank to its second-smallest extent in decades of monitoring, second only to the record-setting melt that alarmed scientists around the world in 2007.
The melting of Arctic sea ice is a powerful indicator of the rapid warming occurring throughout the Arctic. This warming has also increased melting of continental glaciers and the Greenland Ice Sheet, which led scientists earlier this year to project a sea level rise of 0.9 to 1.6 meters (or as much as 5 feet) by the end of this century.
Warming in the Arctic also affects weather in the United States and other countries at mid-latitudes and is thought to be responsible for more severe storms.
This recording presents three leading scientists, introduced by NGO [non-governmental organization] policy experts.

September 15, 2011 | Audio

Telepress ice-melt 2011-09-15 p2

On September 15, 2011, Arctic sea ice shrank to its second-smallest extent in decades of monitoring, second only to the record-setting melt that alarmed scientists around the world in 2007.
The melting of Arctic sea ice is a powerful indicator of the rapid warming occurring throughout the Arctic. This warming has also increased melting of continental glaciers and the Greenland Ice Sheet, which led scientists earlier this year to project a sea level rise of 0.9 to 1.6 meters (or as much as 5 feet) by the end of this century.
Warming in the Arctic also affects weather in the United States and other countries at mid-latitudes and is thought to be responsible for more severe storms.
This recording presents three leading scientists, introduced by NGO [non-governmental organization] policy experts.

September 15, 2011 | Audio

Telepress ice-melt 2011-09-15 p3

On September 15, 2011, Arctic sea ice shrank to its second-smallest extent in decades of monitoring, second only to the record-setting melt that alarmed scientists around the world in 2007.
The melting of Arctic sea ice is a powerful indicator of the rapid warming occurring throughout the Arctic. This warming has also increased melting of continental glaciers and the Greenland Ice Sheet, which led scientists earlier this year to project a sea level rise of 0.9 to 1.6 meters (or as much as 5 feet) by the end of this century.
Warming in the Arctic also affects weather in the United States and other countries at mid-latitudes and is thought to be responsible for more severe storms.
This recording presents three leading scientists, introduced by NGO [non-governmental organization] policy experts.

March 18, 2011 | Audio

Climate Change in Glacier National Park

Research ecologist Dan Fagre of the Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center discusses his work to understand how climate change will affect mountain ecosystems such as Glacier National Park. Fagre predicts that rising temperatures will cause Glacier National Park to be glacier-free by 2020.

August 16, 2010 | Case

Upholding EPA’s Global Warming Endangerment Finding

The Environmental Protection Agency has determined that human activities are driving climate change, which poses a major threat to our planet. This finding has been unsuccessfully challenged by the fossil fuel industry and its allies. Earthjustice helped defend the EPA’s finding to ensure that climate progress is not reversed.

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