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Take Action Frequently Asked Questions

Got a question about how to use our Action Center? Check here first!

I know I signed up for Earthjustice emails. How do I login?

Go to the Earthjustice login page to enter in your User Name and Password. If you don't have that information, request your User Name or reset your Password.

Why would I want to login?

By logging into your Earthjustice account, you can update your email address or mailing address, change your subscription preferences, choose to receive HTML or plain text emails, and more.

My address has changed. How do I update my information?

Login to your Earthjustice account, then click the "Update Profile" link. Or, email your new address to action@earthjustice.org and we will be happy to assist you. Please include the email address you are currently receiving Earthjustice emails at, so that we can locate your account.

Who are my senators and representatives?

To find out who represents you in Congress, go to the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives websites.

You have the wrong representative listed for me on the action form. How can I get this fixed?

For residents of split congressional districts, the database may have incorrectly matched you to a neighboring district. Email us at action@earthjustice.org and we'll correct this error.

Why do I need to add a prefix to my name when taking an action? I prefer not to use one at all.

We understand that some people prefer not to use prefixes on their name. Most of Earthjustice's action alerts do not require prefixes. The only actions which require prefixes are those delivering letters to senators or representatives; those elected officials require that your letters use one of their designated prefixes. If the letters do not include a prefix, they will not be accepted.

How can I write an effective comment/petition/letter using your site?

Be as clear, factual and personal as possible. Point out how you and your home region would be affected by the proposal. Declare your position towards the beginning and restate it at the end. Nearly all of our actions allow you to edit the subject line and message that is being sent to decisionmakers; we encourage you to customize the letter to your own viewpoint and personal experiences.

I take part in all the action alerts. What else can I do?

Try writing a letter to the editor of your local paper. The editorial page is one of the most important sections of any newspaper. More people read the "Letters to the Editor" section than many other portions of the newspaper. This is an ideal forum for conveying your message about environmental and public health issues.

Editors of these newspapers wish to publish criticism, praise or feedback to the stories and columns that have recently appeared. Editors are also looking for ideas and facts. By providing your editor with information on your issues, you are helping them to do their jobs. Keep in mind that editors are not required to print your letter, but usually they feel responsible for equitably and accurately depicting all sides of an issue.

How can I write an effective "Letter to the Editor"?

Tips to maximize the impact of your letter to the editor:

  • Respond quickly. If you wait more than a day or two the issue is old news and it is unlikely that your letter will be published.
  • Keep it short and simple. Use plain language, short sentences and short paragraphs—and get right to the point. Keep it no longer than 180 words. Be clever and present new information.
  • Craft the first paragraph. Make your point in the first paragraph and then present your argument in the paragraphs that follow.
  • Think locally rather than globally. The more relevant you can make an issue to both your own and the readers' circumstances, the more likely it is that your letter will be published. Localize and personalize the issue as much as possible.
  • Use your own words. Don't use a form letter. Let your personality and thoughts show by being serious, humorous or ironic, but don't be nasty or offensive. Creative letters using humor or irony will have a more lasting impression on the reader.
  • Use facts and figures. Where possible, the use of facts and figures elevates your argument above the average "tit-for-tat" verbal skirmishes on the letters pages. These are also more difficult to rebut or to dismiss as mere "opinion."
  • Be polite and calm. Over-emotional responses and rants are more easily dismissed than reasoned arguments. Attack issues, not people.
  • Sum up. Conclude your letter with a single sentence that sums up your main point, argument, or position so that readers are not left hanging in the air.
  • Proof-read. While most newspapers will edit your letter before printing it, spelling and grammatical errors create a bad impression and reduce the chances of your letter being published.
  • Provide contact details. Provide your name, address and telephone number in case the paper needs to contact you. The paper will never print your telephone number or your street address.

How do I make submissions to local and national papers?

Usually, submission information will be printed on the editorial or "Letters to the Editor" page in the newspaper or magazine. Many publications accept email submissions; look for the "feedback" or "comments" link.

I don't see my question answered here. Who can I contact?

For questions regarding emails and action alerts, please contact action@earthjustice.org.

For questions about our website, please contact webmaster@earthjustice.org.

For questions about paper mail or any other general inquiries, please contact info@earthjustice.org or 1-800-584-6460.