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Oil from the BP spill on the beach in Gulf Shores, Ala., on June 12, 2010.

When a polluting corporation wrecks the environment, we all want them to fix what they’ve broken, right? But using cleanup fine money to build a new beachfront hotel? We don’t think so.

A federal judge doesn’t think so either. Earthjustice recently won a victory in the U.S. Southern District of Alabama in a lawsuit we co-filed with Gulf Restoration Network against a group of Alabama and federal agencies.

Solar panels

Today, Earthjustice attorneys were in the Florida Supreme Court arguing a case that could determine the future of solar energy in the state.

You’d think that growing solar power would be a no-brainer in a place with the nickname “the Sunshine State.” But the fact is, our utilities profit from the status quo, which depends on an outdated electric distribution model: building more power plants and fossil-fuel infrastructure.

Supreme court building

Este blog está disponible en español aquí.

Super Tuesday marks a shift of our national attention to what is for most people the most important political battle, the election of a new president. As our attention shifts, we must not lose track of the most critical presidential battle remaining for our current President—nominating a Supreme Court justice.

Update: On February 26 Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in communities hit by the pollution on Florida’s east and west coasts, citing “extensive environmental harm” and “severe economic losses” from ongoing discharges of Lake Okeechobee water to the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. But so far, businesses say they haven’t seen any help.

Sunset saguaro arizona

Arizona is blessed with an abundance of sunshine. The renowned deserts of Arizona are a testament to the power of the region’s rays—and so are all the local teams with names like the Suns and the Sun Devils. This bountiful sunshine means Arizona is well-positioned to lead the nation in developing clean, renewable solar energy. And the state has largely lived up to that potential to date. The U.S.

Low attendance at EPA meetings

“Am I in the right place?” I wondered. The EPA staffers were there, the leaflets arranged, the recorders rolling—but only a handful of the room’s hundred seats were filled. The EPA held a public meeting January 20th in Oakland, Calif., to ask for feedback on proposed changes to rules that guide how the agency deals with civil rights complaints. Just four people came to speak that Wednesday night, and three were with non-profits like Earthjustice that already regularly talk to the EPA.

A royal Bengal tiger photographed in Sundarban National Park, India.

Tigers and dolphins have coexisted in the Sundarbans mangrove forest for thousands of years.

Located on the coast of Bangladesh and India, and roughly the size of Connecticut, the unique habitat has been recognized as a World Heritage site by the United Nations. It’s a place of exceptional biodiversity that’s home to a number of endangered species.

El jefe

El Jefe is the United States’ only known wild jaguar, and earlier this month he was caught on video for the first time. He was filmed in the Santa Rita Mountains in Arizona, just southeast of Tucson. Over the past several years, El Jefe has been photographed on a few rare occasions, but this footage offers considerably more insight about this mysterious animal and his vulnerable habitat for researchers, conservationists and the interested public.

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About the Earthjustice Blog

unEARTHED is a forum for the voices and stories of the people behind Earthjustice's work. The views and opinions expressed in this blog do not necessarily represent the opinion or position of Earthjustice or its board, clients, or funders. Learn more about Earthjustice.