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The Wild

The Latest On: The Wild

January 9, 2013 | Case

Challenging Ammonia Emissions from an Industrial Egg Farm

Earthjustice is representing groups in efforts to clean up ammonia pollution from a massive industrial chicken operation. Rose Acre’s Hyde County facility, the largest industrial egg farm in North Carolina.

January 8, 2013 | Blog Post

Arctic Needs Independent Review Of Drilling

Today, the Department of the Interior announced a 60-day assessment of the 2012 drilling program in the Arctic Ocean.

Earthjustice legislative representative Jessica Ennis issued this statement:

A review of Arctic Ocean drilling is the only reasonable option, given the continuous parade of mistakes in Shell’s operations. However, that review must be thorough, independent and cannot pre-judge the outcome.

January 7, 2013 | Case

Bison Return to Ancestral Lands

Bison are the only native wildlife species still unnaturally confined to the political boundaries of Yellowstone National Park for any part of the year.

January 7, 2013 | Press Release: Victory

Court Rules Bison Can Roam

Rejects unreasonable demand to return to widespread buffalo slaughter

January 7, 2013 | Case

Protecting Lake Tahoe from a Massive Ski Resort Expansion

In a move to protect the environmental quality of a lake known for its natural beauty, community members and conservationists asked a federal court to reject an inadequate Environmental Impact Report and to stop the construction of a 325-unit complex along California’s scenic west shore of Lake Tahoe. Earthjustice is representing the Sierra Club, as well as Friends of the West Shore, a grassroots community organization representing more than 500 members from the California side of Lake Tahoe.

January 4, 2013 | Blog Post

Shell's Drill Rigs Requiring Extra Federal Attention

With one Arctic drill rig shipwrecked on an Alaskan island and the other reportedly under criminal investigation for possibly “operating with serious safety and pollution control problems,” oil giant Royal Dutch Shell is doing a pretty thorough job at proving the quest for oil in the pristine waters of America’s Arctic is just too dangerous, too dirty, and too damaging. The week’s events also prove once again that the U.S. Department of Interior should not have approved drilling in the most remote, dangerous place on the planet.

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