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The Wild

The Latest On: The Wild

October 26, 2012 | Feature

Energy Bars of the Sea

Everything in the ocean is food to something else, a food web comprising many food chains. Earthjustice attorneys are stepping in to help stop the plunder of the ocean’s larders.

October 25, 2012 | Blog Post

Conservationists Act to Protect Sensitive Bay and Crab Fishery in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest

Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest is as much ocean as land. It includes saltwater bays, fjords, canals, channels, and too many islands to count.

At this intersection of land and ocean, life flourishes where forest creeks and streams empty nutrients into shallow saltwater bays. Among other species, dungeness crabs flourish, fed seasonally by the carcasses of spawned out salmon.

One such estuary 20 miles south of Petersburg in Alexander Bay is a place called the Pothole. It’s named for the crab pots used by the commercial crab fishery that thrives there.

October 24, 2012 | Case

Protecting Hawai'i’s Reef from the Aquarium Trade

Important creatures in Hawai’i’s reef ecosystems are being captured for private aquariums, exposing the reefs to algal growth and robbing them of resiliency. Earthjustice is fighting to stop this destructive practice so that Hawaii’s beautiful reefs have a fighting chance to survive.

October 19, 2012 | Blog Post

How Clean Are Your Local Waterways?

You know that creek in your backyard, or the river or lake near your town? Have any idea what kind of condition it is in, or how polluted it is?

Most people probably don't  -- up until now, it hasn't been very easy to get this information. But to help people find out about the condition of their local waterways, in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, yesterday the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched a supercool new app for your computer or mobile device that allows you to learn about the quality of the waters near you.

October 19, 2012 | Blog Post

Lies, Damned Lies And Coal Company Biologists

Coal companies have been blasting mountains, dumping waste rock into streams, and undermining private and public lands for more than a century. It’s apparently lucrative to do so.

But a recent filing by a coal company shows just how far they have drunk their own Kool-Aid (or coal ash?) in justifying the damage mining can cause.

The filing concerned Earthjustice’s efforts to protect the Sunset Roadless Area on the GMUG National Forest in western Colorado. The Sunset area is a landscape of pine, fir, and aspen stands, dotted with wet meadows and beaver ponds.

October 18, 2012 | Blog Post

Time To Slay Another Dragon At Fisheating Creek

As everyone involved in the environmental movement knows, we’ve got to stay vigilant with each passing year to make sure that that our victories don’t get undone.

So, on Oct. 2, the Florida office of Earthjustice filed suit to protect a landmark citizen’s victory that we won in a jury trial 15 years ago. Once again, we find ourselves sharpening swords to slay a dragon that we thought we’d already vanquished. And the newest move by the state has an Alice-in-Wonderland quality—the upside-down world.

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