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Clean Energy

The Ohio Statehouse in Columbus.

At a time when states should be ramping up their renewable energy efforts, at least one state that was on track to source about an eighth of its energy from renewables suddenly reversed course under the pressure of a few fossil-fuel friendly state assemblymen. Ohio had strong state goals for renewable generation seeking 12.5% of its electricity to be generated from clean sources such as solar and wind. This summer, however, progress in the Buckeye State was halted when Governor John Kasich signed a bill that froze Ohio’s renewable portfolio standard for two years.

A wind farm located along I-10, west of Palm Springs, California.

When it comes to renewable energy, California leads the nation. You might assume that California has taken the lead because of its abundance of natural resources, such as sun and wind, that power renewable energy. But California isn’t the only state where the sun shines and the wind blows.

A scientist holds a lithium Ion battery made in the materials lab at the Solar Energy Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO.

California’s energy storage market is showing just how regulation can encourage innovation. Last year, California’s Public Utilities Commission set the nation’s first energy storage procurement targets, over the initial opposition of the state’s three largest utilities. Now, a year later, the targets are in place and the utilities are actively working to meet them, invigorating California’s energy storage market in the process.

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