Skip to main content

Clean Air

The Latest On: Clean Air

December 14, 2012 | Article

Lives and Lungs Protected from Deadly Pollutant

Earthjustice litigation, on behalf of public health and environmental groups, spurred the Obama administration to set strong new standards for soot pollution—the first significant update since 1997. The new standards will annually prevent as many as 15,000 premature deaths and reduce health costs by $118 billion.

December 14, 2012 | Press Release: Victory

EPA Acts to Protect Lives, Lungs from Soot

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) adopted protections that will slash the amount of soot allowed in our air, improving air quality for millions of Americans. This move by the EPA comes in response to legal action filed by Earthjustice on behalf of the American Lung Association and the National Parks Conservation Association asking that the EPA follow the Clean Air Act’s requirements to protect the public’s health and well-being.

October 22, 2012 | Case

Cleaning Up Coal On The Moapa Reservation

Under pressure from Earthjustice, the Reid Gardner coal plant, near the Moapa River Reservation in Nevada, shut down in 2013. It was too old and obsolete to clean up its act – a situation faced by old coal plants across the nation as they fight to keep their facilities dirty and open.

August 6, 2012 | Case

Cleaning Up Haze In National Parks

Earthjustice is challenging a 2012 EPA rule that allows aging coal plants to avoid installing up-to-date emission controls if they are located in states that participate in an emissions trading program.

July 20, 2012 | Article

Surprises Arise at Clean Air Public Forum

"This morning's testimony was so moving, I wish I'd had tissues with me," said one speaker. "It never occurred to me that I would need them at an EPA public hearing."

June 20, 2012 | Article

Soot Gets Editorial Ink

The historical significance of the Environmental Protection Agency's recently proposed new limits on fine particle pollution, colloquially called soot, wasn't lost on a number of editorial pages.

Pages